Posts tagged policy

Policy Meets Design: Rebranding Immigrant Day Labor
andrewshea and JeffSmithMO contributed in New York City, Immigration and Policy

It’s 4:45 a.m. A Guatemalan day laborer wakes up in his Staten Island home that was damaged during Hurricane Sandy. By 5:45 a.m. he needs to be at the same street corner where he always waits for contractors when they come by looking for workers. It’s dark and rainy outside, and he’ll be soaked by the time he’s picked up. It’s no way to start a day and just one of many reasons why permanent hiring halls are needed, and have been an goal of one New York City organization since it first started.

El Centro del Inmigrante is a Staten Island group that promotes the economic advancement and security of immigrant workers. We partnered with El Centro during the Spring 2013 semester as part of a unique collaboration at The New School between Milano Urban Policy students and Parsons’ Communication Design students. Our goal was to envision a new hiring hall in Staten Island.

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Join EFF in Calling for a Full Investigation Into NSA Surveillance By Emailing Congress Today- Meghan Neal wrote in Technology, Privacy and Policy
It’s time for a full accounting of America’s secret spying programs—and an end to unconstitutional surveillance.

Continue to eff.org

Join EFF in Calling for a Full Investigation Into NSA Surveillance By Emailing Congress Today
Meghan Neal wrote in Technology, Privacy and Policy

It’s time for a full accounting of America’s secret spying programs—and an end to unconstitutional surveillance.

Continue to eff.org

Occupying Democracy: Amendments to Get Money out of Politics- Russell Simmons and David DeGraw

The future of our democracy cannot be for sale. Politicians must represent the people who elected them, not those who donated to their campaigns. All of the challenges that the American people face are grossly influenced by money in politics, and that is why we strongly support a constitutional amendment to restore our democracy and protect the people of this great nation.
A very broad coalition is uniting around this vital issue and it is just a matter of time before we reach critical mass. With the help of the GOOD community, we can soon reach a tipping point that forces historic political change. 
Thousands of working groups are spread throughout the country, organizing toward the same goal: ending the corrupt culture that has consumed our government by getting money out of politics. 
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Occupying Democracy: Amendments to Get Money out of Politics
- Russell Simmons and David DeGraw

The future of our democracy cannot be for sale. Politicians must represent the people who elected them, not those who donated to their campaigns. All of the challenges that the American people face are grossly influenced by money in politics, and that is why we strongly support a constitutional amendment to restore our democracy and protect the people of this great nation.

A very broad coalition is uniting around this vital issue and it is just a matter of time before we reach critical mass. With the help of the GOOD community, we can soon reach a tipping point that forces historic political change. 

Thousands of working groups are spread throughout the country, organizing toward the same goal: ending the corrupt culture that has consumed our government by getting money out of politics. 

Continue reading on good.is

Taken Aback by Take Back Tuesday - by David Mizner
In the summer, when Josh Neuman and I were talking about the effort that would become Take Back Tuesday, he said he thought business owners would be willing to close up shop for Election Day, to help employees vote and otherwise celebrate democracy. I was skeptical.
We know now that Josh was right. In 21 states and Washington D.C., 69 businesses participated in the DIY holiday. They signed on perhaps because it was, as Anthony DiMarco at Neiman in Philadelphia says, a “simple and great idea,” but certainly because they wanted to restore our democracy. The democracy that, in the words of Made Movement’s Alex Bogusky, "has made our business possible in the first place.”
The first 50 to sign on, like Sports Science in Fairfax, Virginia, received a limited edition poster, but it was apparently possible to Take Back Tuesday even without this gem. Judging by reports on Twitter, people loved celebrating Election Day.
Please see the inspiring photos here, here, here, here & here.
Take Back Tuesday encouraged not just businesses, but also individuals to turn Election Day into a holiday. Many of you came up with great ideas, like Allen Salkin’s Bonfire of the Inanities: “At noon on Election Day everyone burns everything campaign related they have been mailed, handed, or forced to read in the newspaper.”
Josh urged me to take an honest measure of the campaign. So I’ll point out that we had a slight messaging problem. Some, like this Atlantic writer, likened our effort to past calls to make Election Day a national holiday, not realizing we were asking people to create their own holiday.
Nonetheless, this effort was a big success. I enjoyed participating and, more generally, I loved interacting with the GOOD community.
I come out of blog world, which lends itself to rants, and I can rant with the best of them. But my anger derives from idealism, and my idealism has found a cozy home here at GOOD, where people focus not just on problems but also on solutions. So, thanks.
We’ve elected a president, but the monumental job of strengthening our democracy continues. Onward…
Illustration by Tyler Hoehne

Taken Aback by Take Back Tuesday - by David Mizner

In the summer, when Josh Neuman and I were talking about the effort that would become Take Back Tuesday, he said he thought business owners would be willing to close up shop for Election Day, to help employees vote and otherwise celebrate democracy. I was skeptical.

We know now that Josh was right. In 21 states and Washington D.C., 69 businesses participated in the DIY holiday. They signed on perhaps because it was, as Anthony DiMarco at Neiman in Philadelphia says, a “simple and great idea,” but certainly because they wanted to restore our democracy. The democracy that, in the words of Made Movement’s Alex Bogusky, "has made our business possible in the first place.”

The first 50 to sign on, like Sports Science in Fairfax, Virginia, received a limited edition poster, but it was apparently possible to Take Back Tuesday even without this gem. Judging by reports on Twitter, people loved celebrating Election Day.

Please see the inspiring photos here, here, here, here & here.

Take Back Tuesday encouraged not just businesses, but also individuals to turn Election Day into a holiday. Many of you came up with great ideas, like Allen Salkin’s Bonfire of the Inanities: “At noon on Election Day everyone burns everything campaign related they have been mailed, handed, or forced to read in the newspaper.”

Josh urged me to take an honest measure of the campaign. So I’ll point out that we had a slight messaging problem. Some, like this Atlantic writer, likened our effort to past calls to make Election Day a national holiday, not realizing we were asking people to create their own holiday.

Nonetheless, this effort was a big success. I enjoyed participating and, more generally, I loved interacting with the GOOD community.

I come out of blog world, which lends itself to rants, and I can rant with the best of them. But my anger derives from idealism, and my idealism has found a cozy home here at GOOD, where people focus not just on problems but also on solutions. So, thanks.

We’ve elected a president, but the monumental job of strengthening our democracy continues. Onward…

Illustration by Tyler Hoehne

http://takebacktuesday.good.is
Poster design by Tyler Hoehne

http://takebacktuesday.good.is

Poster design by Tyler Hoehne

For Those of Us Who Have Kids: Tuesday Is Bring Your Children to the Voting Booth Day - by David Mizner
I’ve been writing a lot about the need to create an American culture of voting. That’s what exists in places with high turnout, and that’s what the Take Back Tuesday campaign aims to help create.
Culture is passed down from one generation to the next, so this election season I’m planning to take my two older sons (Baby Izzy can wait till 2014) to the polling station (which, I should point out, is located in the lobby of my apartment building). 
Not just to the polling station but into the booth. Wait—is that legal? Yeah, you can show your kids what goes on behind the curtain as long as they’re younger than 18. The process, with the machine and booth, is likely to captivate young children, and older ones—well, they probably won’t mind it. It’s a chance, in any case, to start a tradition that they may someday pass down.
Ideally, Election Day would be a national holiday, a civic celebration, and a trip to the polls with family and friends would be just one among several communal, festive activities. Till then, and to that end, create your own celebratory customs, bring your children to the polls, Take Back Tuesday.
This post is part of the Take Back Tuesday campaign to make Voting Day a national holiday. Sign up or encourage your company to join in at takebacktuesday.good.is.
Illustration by Tyler Hoehne

For Those of Us Who Have Kids: Tuesday Is Bring Your Children to the Voting Booth Day - by David Mizner

I’ve been writing a lot about the need to create an American culture of voting. That’s what exists in places with high turnout, and that’s what the Take Back Tuesday campaign aims to help create.

Culture is passed down from one generation to the next, so this election season I’m planning to take my two older sons (Baby Izzy can wait till 2014) to the polling station (which, I should point out, is located in the lobby of my apartment building). 

Not just to the polling station but into the booth. Wait—is that legal? Yeah, you can show your kids what goes on behind the curtain as long as they’re younger than 18. The process, with the machine and booth, is likely to captivate young children, and older ones—well, they probably won’t mind it. It’s a chance, in any case, to start a tradition that they may someday pass down.

Ideally, Election Day would be a national holiday, a civic celebration, and a trip to the polls with family and friends would be just one among several communal, festive activities. Till then, and to that end, create your own celebratory customs, bring your children to the polls, Take Back Tuesday.

This post is part of the Take Back Tuesday campaign to make Voting Day a national holiday. Sign up or encourage your company to join in at takebacktuesday.good.is.

Illustration by Tyler Hoehne

Know Your Ballot: How to Vote on Your 2012 Propositions
A helpful tool to review both sides of every 2012 proposition—from all 50 states—that needs your vote.
You can even print out your preferences and take it with you to the polls!
Brought to you by GOOD HQ

Know Your Ballot: How to Vote on Your 2012 Propositions

A helpful tool to review both sides of every 2012 proposition—from all 50 states—that needs your vote.

You can even print out your preferences and take it with you to the polls!

Brought to you by GOOD HQ

National Coming Out Day: Why Celebrating This Radical Act is More Relevant Than Ever 
I came out to my parents during my final year of seminary in North Carolina—almost a decade ago. After fumbling and mumbling about my “friend” who they had met earlier in the year, I managed to blurt out that my “friend” and I were “more than friends” and that I was gay. 
My mom ended the conversation right then and there. “I don’t want to talk about this any more,” she said. My dad? He offered to help me do my taxes. After sweating and pacing and feeling my heart in my throat for day, it was an anti-climactic moment that my parents and I are still working our way through. Each time we visit together, I have to come out again and again. It’s gotten easier for me with each passing year—but for too many young people across this country, it hasn’t.Every year since 1988, lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) Americans have celebrated National Coming Out Day. Far from a hokey chance to sell merchandise, National Coming Out Day is a celebration of a radical act.
Continue reading on good.is

National Coming Out Day: Why Celebrating This Radical Act is More Relevant Than Ever 

I came out to my parents during my final year of seminary in North Carolina—almost a decade ago. After fumbling and mumbling about my “friend” who they had met earlier in the year, I managed to blurt out that my “friend” and I were “more than friends” and that I was gay. 

My mom ended the conversation right then and there. “I don’t want to talk about this any more,” she said. My dad? He offered to help me do my taxes. After sweating and pacing and feeling my heart in my throat for day, it was an anti-climactic moment that my parents and I are still working our way through. Each time we visit together, I have to come out again and again. It’s gotten easier for me with each passing year—but for too many young people across this country, it hasn’t.

Every year since 1988, lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) Americans have celebrated National Coming Out Day. Far from a hokey chance to sell merchandise, National Coming Out Day is a celebration of a radical act.

Continue reading on good.is

How You Can Help Fix Our Half Democracy - by David Mizner

The United States is no longer a democracy: you’ve heard that claim. Usually the people making it are referring to corporate control of our political system, or perhaps the erosion of our rights. But in a very literal sense, American democracy is in trouble: barely half of us, if that, vote.

Illustration by Tyler HoehneAD: Jessica De Jesus 

How You Can Help Fix Our Half Democracy - by David Mizner

The United States is no longer a democracy: you’ve heard that claim. Usually the people making it are referring to corporate control of our political system, or perhaps the erosion of our rights. But in a very literal sense, American democracy is in trouble: barely half of us, if that, vote.

Illustration by Tyler Hoehne
AD: Jessica De Jesus 

Here’s what you can do on good.is today!
Welcome to a new, connected, more collaborative good.is!Let’s learn and do more good — together.

Welcome to a new, connected, more collaborative good.is!
Let’s learn and do more good — together.

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Why Do People Vote? (Hint: ‘Cause We’re Not ‘Rational Maximizers’) by David Mizner

Research shows that applying social pressure, tapping into people’s sense of obligation, is one of the most effective ways of getting them to vote.

Illustration by Tyler HoehneAD, Jessica De Jesus

Why Do People Vote? (Hint: ‘Cause We’re Not ‘Rational Maximizers’) by David Mizner

Research shows that applying social pressure, tapping into people’s sense of obligation, is one of the most effective ways of getting them to vote.

Illustration by Tyler Hoehne
AD, Jessica De Jesus

To Boost Turnout, Make Election Day a Celebration
Illustration by Jessica De Jesus