Posts tagged news

Push for Good: This Week’s Guide to Crowdfunding Creative Progress- Alessandra Rizzotti wrote in Culture, News and Goodness

Innovation makes the world go around, so why not crowdfund it? The best thinkers and ideamakers are the those that can make collective progress, so if we support their causes, projects, and ideas, we can be a part of bettering the future of our planet.
Maybe you don’t know what causes you care about yet, or maybe you’re still searching. Consider this a guide of the goodness you can get behind. Take a look at GOOD’s curated Kickstarter page, which we’ll be updating regularly, and check back every Saturday for a round up of our favorite projects from the crowdfunding world.
Taxonomy of Trash (5 days left)
Tomorrow’s Lemonade Stand (5 days left)
Documentary About Filmmakers Brought Together by the Egyptian Revolution (16 days left)
Documentary Film In Pursuit of Silence (17 days left)
Tapigami Presents Hacker Glasses (18 days left)
Brooklyn Aerodrome Flight School (21 days left)
 
 
 
 
 
 
Tell us what projects you’re getting behind in the comments below. Push progress forward, and do it for our collective good.
Continue reading on good.is
Illustration by Jessica De Jesus. Image from Vintage Printable.

Push for Good: This Week’s Guide to Crowdfunding Creative Progress
Alessandra Rizzotti wrote in Culture, News and Goodness

Innovation makes the world go around, so why not crowdfund it? The best thinkers and ideamakers are the those that can make collective progress, so if we support their causes, projects, and ideas, we can be a part of bettering the future of our planet.

Maybe you don’t know what causes you care about yet, or maybe you’re still searching. Consider this a guide of the goodness you can get behind. Take a look at GOOD’s curated Kickstarter page, which we’ll be updating regularly, and check back every Saturday for a round up of our favorite projects from the crowdfunding world.

Tell us what projects you’re getting behind in the comments below. Push progress forward, and do it for our collective good.

Continue reading on good.is

Illustration by Jessica De Jesus. Image from Vintage Printable.

Infographic: Mapping Our Oil Pipeline- Focus the Nation and Oliver Munday contributed in in Environment, Energy and News
It’s Energy month at GOOD, so we’ve teamed up with Portland, Oregon’s Focus the Nation, an organization that’s empowering youth to make smart environmental choices in their communities. This infographic is part of a series exploring our use of energy resources.
Where does gasoline come from? Believe it or not, it’s not just one system that makes it possible for you to fuel up at your local gas station. From gathering pipelines that include oil wells on land and tankers overseas, to hundred-mile-long crude oil trunk lines that transport from gathering systems to refined product lines, oil still doesn’t reach the consumer until storage and distribution terminals are involved. And, in case you’re picturing these pipelines as similar to the water pipes in your home, oil pipes can range in size from 2 to 42 inches in diameter, and are owned and operated by companies that are regulated by federal and state governments. 
In the United States alone, there are roughly 150,000 miles of crude oil pipelines, 55,000 miles of which are trunk lines and 95,000 miles of which are refined product pipelines. Perhaps the most well-known American trunk lines are the Trans-Alaska Pipeline System, and most recently, the Keystone XL Pipeline, which has become a point of contention in our federal government. Click on the infographic above to see how an oil pipeline system works.
This month, challenge a neighbor to GOOD’s energy smackdown. Find a neighbor with a household of roughly the same square footage and see who can trim their power bill the most. Throughout February, we’ll share ideas and resources for shrinking your household carbon footprint, so join the conversation at good.is/energy.

Infographic: Mapping Our Oil Pipeline
Focus the Nation and Oliver Munday contributed in in Environment, Energy and News

It’s Energy month at GOOD, so we’ve teamed up with Portland, Oregon’s Focus the Nation, an organization that’s empowering youth to make smart environmental choices in their communities. This infographic is part of a series exploring our use of energy resources.

Where does gasoline come from? Believe it or not, it’s not just one system that makes it possible for you to fuel up at your local gas station. From gathering pipelines that include oil wells on land and tankers overseas, to hundred-mile-long crude oil trunk lines that transport from gathering systems to refined product lines, oil still doesn’t reach the consumer until storage and distribution terminals are involved. And, in case you’re picturing these pipelines as similar to the water pipes in your home, oil pipes can range in size from 2 to 42 inches in diameter, and are owned and operated by companies that are regulated by federal and state governments. 

In the United States alone, there are roughly 150,000 miles of crude oil pipelines, 55,000 miles of which are trunk lines and 95,000 miles of which are refined product pipelines. Perhaps the most well-known American trunk lines are the Trans-Alaska Pipeline System, and most recently, the Keystone XL Pipeline, which has become a point of contention in our federal government. Click on the infographic above to see how an oil pipeline system works.

This month, challenge a neighbor to GOOD’s energy smackdown. Find a neighbor with a household of roughly the same square footage and see who can trim their power bill the most. Throughout February, we’ll share ideas and resources for shrinking your household carbon footprint, so join the conversation at good.is/energy.

The GOODEST: Hyper-Detailed Calculations of a Carbon Footprint- Alessandra Rizzotti and Jessica De Jesus contributed in News, Climate Change and Energy
The GOODEST can be so many things, but why not just narrow it down to one thing each week? We’ll change it up and keep it fresh. After all, we consume so much daily, so for the weekend, why not just take away one great learn and do from the week?
Why Carbon Footprints Matter: What I Learned From My Hyper-Detailed Calculations
Saul Griffith, co-founder of renewable energy company Otherlab, figured out his exact personal carbon footprint—from every glass of wine, to a new pair of underwear. What he found out about his own personal impact was pretty grim…
Will you measure your carbon footprint?
This post is part of the GOOD community’s 50 Building Blocks of Citizenship. Follow along and join the discussion at #goodcitizen.
Also, this month, challenge a neighbor to GOOD’s energy smackdown. Find a neighbor with a household of roughly the same square footage and see who can trim their power bill the most. Throughout February, we’ll share ideas and resources for shrinking your household carbon footprint, so join the conversation at good.is/energy.
Illustration by Jessica De Jesus. Image from El Bibliomata

The GOODEST: Hyper-Detailed Calculations of a Carbon Footprint
Alessandra Rizzotti and Jessica De Jesus contributed in News, Climate Change and Energy

The GOODEST can be so many things, but why not just narrow it down to one thing each week? We’ll change it up and keep it fresh. After all, we consume so much daily, so for the weekend, why not just take away one great learn and do from the week?

Why Carbon Footprints Matter: What I Learned From My Hyper-Detailed Calculations

Saul Griffith, co-founder of renewable energy company Otherlab, figured out his exact personal carbon footprint—from every glass of wine, to a new pair of underwear. What he found out about his own personal impact was pretty grim…

Will you measure your carbon footprint?

This post is part of the GOOD community’s 50 Building Blocks of Citizenship. Follow along and join the discussion at #goodcitizen.

Also, this month, challenge a neighbor to GOOD’s energy smackdown. Find a neighbor with a household of roughly the same square footage and see who can trim their power bill the most. Throughout February, we’ll share ideas and resources for shrinking your household carbon footprint, so join the conversation at good.is/energy.

Illustration by Jessica De Jesus. Image from El Bibliomata

Infographic: From Energy Production to Electricity Consumption- GOOD Partnerships and Focus the Nation and Oliver Munday contributed in Environment, Energy and News
It’s Energy month at GOOD, so we’ve teamed up with Portland, Oregon’s Focus the Nation, an organization that’s empowering youth to make smart environmental choices in their communities. This infographic is part of a series exploring our use of energy resources.
Powering on your computer is more than just pressing a button. The flow of electricity is made possible from multiple energy sources, whether they’re imported and exported fossil fuels, like natural gas, petroleum, and coal, or domestically-produced nuclear electric power and renewable energy. Check out our latest infographic above that shows how the electricity around us flows from source to consumption. You can follow the U.S. electricity flow from production on the left to consumption on the right, with energy’s measured in quadrillion British ton units (Btu). With all this electricity wasted, it is clear we need to conserve our energy sources.
What is primarily fueling the activities of our modern economy today are the fossil fuels which have stored the sun’s energy over more than a millenium, coupled with nuclear power, which has been around for only the last five decades. If the United States is to prepare for a more sustainable future, it must start turning to renewable energy to meet our energy needs, using sources like hydroelectric power, biomass, geothermal, solar-photovoltaic, and wind.
To learn more about the Energy discussion on GOOD, visit our Energy hub and follow Focus the Nation.

Infographic: From Energy Production to Electricity Consumption
GOOD Partnerships and Focus the Nation and Oliver Munday contributed in Environment, Energy and News

It’s Energy month at GOOD, so we’ve teamed up with Portland, Oregon’s Focus the Nation, an organization that’s empowering youth to make smart environmental choices in their communities. This infographic is part of a series exploring our use of energy resources.

Powering on your computer is more than just pressing a button. The flow of electricity is made possible from multiple energy sources, whether they’re imported and exported fossil fuels, like natural gas, petroleum, and coal, or domestically-produced nuclear electric power and renewable energy. Check out our latest infographic above that shows how the electricity around us flows from source to consumption. You can follow the U.S. electricity flow from production on the left to consumption on the right, with energy’s measured in quadrillion British ton units (Btu). With all this electricity wasted, it is clear we need to conserve our energy sources.

What is primarily fueling the activities of our modern economy today are the fossil fuels which have stored the sun’s energy over more than a millenium, coupled with nuclear power, which has been around for only the last five decades. If the United States is to prepare for a more sustainable future, it must start turning to renewable energy to meet our energy needs, using sources like hydroelectric power, biomass, geothermal, solar-photovoltaic, and wind.

To learn more about the Energy discussion on GOOD, visit our Energy hub and follow Focus the Nation.

The GOODEST: Coal, The Poison We Never Talk About in School- Alessandra Rizzotti and Jessica De Jesus contributed in Environment, News and Climate Change
The GOODEST can be so many things, but why not just narrow it down to one thing each week? We’ll change it up and keep it fresh. After all, we consume so much daily, so for the weekend, why not just take away one big learn and do from the week?
This might be shocking but…
Coal is The Poison We Never Talk About in School
James Hansen, director of NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies and arguably the world’s foremost climatologist, has called coal “the single greatest threat to civilization and all life on the planet”, yet kids think it’s just a 19th-century phenomenon.
Can you DO anything about it?
Of course, and we’re going to help you through it. Energy month at GOOD begins now, and each day we’ll be sharing how you can contribute to a better climate reality. Get on the Energy hub to learn more.
Illustration by Jessica de Jesus. Photo via (cc) Flickr user -0-.

The GOODEST: Coal, The Poison We Never Talk About in School
Alessandra Rizzotti and Jessica De Jesus contributed in Environment, News and Climate Change

The GOODEST can be so many things, but why not just narrow it down to one thing each week? We’ll change it up and keep it fresh. After all, we consume so much daily, so for the weekend, why not just take away one big learn and do from the week?

This might be shocking but…

Coal is The Poison We Never Talk About in School

James Hansen, director of NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies and arguably the world’s foremost climatologist, has called coal “the single greatest threat to civilization and all life on the planet”, yet kids think it’s just a 19th-century phenomenon.

Can you DO anything about it?

Of course, and we’re going to help you through it. Energy month at GOOD begins now, and each day we’ll be sharing how you can contribute to a better climate reality. Get on the Energy hub to learn more.

Illustration by Jessica de Jesus. Photo via (cc) Flickr user -0-.

The GOODEST: Make a Pro Bono Commitment-Alessandra Rizzotti and Jessica De Jesus contributed in Business, Culture and News
The GOODEST can be so many things, but why not just narrow it down to one thing each week? We’ll change it up and keep it fresh. After all, we consume so much daily, so for the weekend, why not just take away one great learn and do from the week?
Help Your Company Add a Pro Bono Service Program
Public Architecture wrote this downloadable letter so that you can urge your CEO tomake meaningful work a part of actual work.
Will you fill out the letter and send it off? Tell us here.
Illustration by Jessica de Jesus. Original image from Auctiva.

The GOODEST: Make a Pro Bono Commitment
-Alessandra Rizzotti and Jessica De Jesus contributed in Business, Culture and News

The GOODEST can be so many things, but why not just narrow it down to one thing each week? We’ll change it up and keep it fresh. After all, we consume so much daily, so for the weekend, why not just take away one great learn and do from the week?

Help Your Company Add a Pro Bono Service Program

Public Architecture wrote this downloadable letter so that you can urge your CEO tomake meaningful work a part of actual work.

Will you fill out the letter and send it off? Tell us here.

Illustration by Jessica de Jesus. Original image from Auctiva.

Announcing The Great American Teach-Off 2013: Nominate an Innovative Teacher to Win $10K- GOOD Maker wrote in Education, Great American Teach Off and News
GOOD and University of Phoenix are proud to announce the launch of the second annual Great American Teach-Off for teachers in grades K through 12.
This program is a nationwide competition to celebrate U.S.-based elementary, middle and high school teachers that are engaging students to learn effectively and graduate successfully. Whether these teachers have innovative teaching methods, create unique classroom projects, or organize inspiring after-school programs that encourage community involvement in their school, we want to hear more about them!
Here’s how it works: Nominate an outstanding teacher currently teaching in grades K through 6 or 7 through 12—it can be a teacher you’ve had, your child’s, or even yourself—by February 15 noon PT. We’ll select the finalists based on how they foster creativity in the classroom, help students learn beyond the classroom, and impact the greater school community.
We’ll announce the top 20 finalists on March 4 noon PT. Finalists will share videos responding to a short list of questions about their teaching experience, and the GOOD community will vote for their favorite teacher over the course of five weeks. At the end of five weeks, the top voted K through 6 teacher and the top voted 7 through 12 teacher will each receive a $10,000 classroom grant. 
Dedicated teachers that are pushing students to learn and think in different ways deserve to be recognized. Give these teachers the chance to further learning in their classroom by nominating them in The Great American Teach-Off by February 15 noon PT. Watch profiles of last year’s winning teachers, Terry Dougherty and Daryl Bilandzija to get inspired.
You can join the conversation with this challenge on Twitter at @GOODmkr and @TeachOff via #teachoff.
This post is brought to you by GOOD with support from University of Phoenix

Announcing The Great American Teach-Off 2013: Nominate an Innovative Teacher to Win $10K
GOOD Maker wrote in Education, Great American Teach Off and News

GOOD and University of Phoenix are proud to announce the launch of the second annual Great American Teach-Off for teachers in grades K through 12.

This program is a nationwide competition to celebrate U.S.-based elementary, middle and high school teachers that are engaging students to learn effectively and graduate successfully. Whether these teachers have innovative teaching methods, create unique classroom projects, or organize inspiring after-school programs that encourage community involvement in their school, we want to hear more about them!

Here’s how it works: Nominate an outstanding teacher currently teaching in grades K through 6 or 7 through 12—it can be a teacher you’ve had, your child’s, or even yourself—by February 15 noon PT. We’ll select the finalists based on how they foster creativity in the classroom, help students learn beyond the classroom, and impact the greater school community.

We’ll announce the top 20 finalists on March 4 noon PT. Finalists will share videos responding to a short list of questions about their teaching experience, and the GOOD community will vote for their favorite teacher over the course of five weeks. At the end of five weeks, the top voted K through 6 teacher and the top voted 7 through 12 teacher will each receive a $10,000 classroom grant. 

Dedicated teachers that are pushing students to learn and think in different ways deserve to be recognized. Give these teachers the chance to further learning in their classroom by nominating them in The Great American Teach-Off by February 15 noon PT. Watch profiles of last year’s winning teachers, Terry Dougherty and Daryl Bilandzija to get inspired.

You can join the conversation with this challenge on Twitter at @GOODmkr and @TeachOff via #teachoff.

This post is brought to you by GOOD with support from University of Phoenix

The GOODEST: Five of Our Favorite Things to Learn and Do- Alessandra Rizzotti and Jessica De Jesus contributed in Culture and News
We’re picking five great things to highlight from this past week, plus a community member that’s making waves on our online platform. 
The Treasury Department said ‘no’ to the trillion dollar coin, so send us your designs and maybe we could mint the coin.
12-year-old Sicily Kolbeck inspired us to build a tiny house and set our own course…
But, for any idea to become a reality, a lone visionary isn’t always enough…
I mean, together we can be superheroes.
Illustration by Jessica De Jesus. Original photograph by David Gonzalez

The GOODEST: Five of Our Favorite Things to Learn and Do
Alessandra Rizzotti and Jessica De Jesus contributed in Culture and News

We’re picking five great things to highlight from this past week, plus a community member that’s making waves on our online platform. 

  • The Treasury Department said ‘no’ to the trillion dollar coin, so send us your designs and maybe we could mint the coin.

Illustration by Jessica De Jesus. Original photograph by David Gonzalez

The GOODEST: Our Favorite Things to Learn and Do This Past Week- Alessandra Rizzotti wrote in News, Do and Goodest
You can learn about so many things on the internet, but how much more powerful would it be if you could also DO after you learned stuff? From a lesson about The Emancipation Proclamation to joining Obama’s Day of Service and applying to be a Mars colonist, we have things for you to learn and do from this week. Oh, and since we’re always learning from the GOOD community, we’re starting to share member profiles that are starting great discussions and activating the online platform.
Let’s Learn
There’s No Race Like Home: ‘Searching for Zion’ Explores Being Biracial in America
Here’s What Energy Company ‘Land Men’ Tell Homeowners in Rural Eastern Ohio
Rebrand Your ‘Hood for Good
'Kale-Eating Overlord' Musk Will Allow Meat on Mars—If It's Viable
The Emancipation Proclamation Story Not Taught in Schools
Retrofitting Surburbia: Bringing Life to Vacant Spaces
The Digital Divide? It’s at Your Local School, Too
Softwalks: Turning Scaffolding into Pop-up Parks
The Tricycle House and Garden Imagines a Sustainable World on Three Wheels
 
Let’s Do:
Share Files You Don’t Want with People You Don’t Know
Help Support a New Design to Remove Landmines
Volunteer for the Los Angeles Homeless Count 2013
Build Public Schools That Create More Energy Than They Use
Join Obama’s Day of Service
Illustration by Jessica de JesusOriginal Image via (cc) flickr user Markle1

The GOODEST: Our Favorite Things to Learn and Do This Past Week
Alessandra Rizzotti wrote in News, Do and Goodest

You can learn about so many things on the internet, but how much more powerful would it be if you could also DO after you learned stuff? From a lesson about The Emancipation Proclamation to joining Obama’s Day of Service and applying to be a Mars colonist, we have things for you to learn and do from this week. Oh, and since we’re always learning from the GOOD community, we’re starting to share member profiles that are starting great discussions and activating the online platform.

Let’s Learn

Let’s Do:

Illustration by Jessica de Jesus
Original Image via (cc) flickr user Markle1

The GOODEST: Our Favorite Things To Learn and Do This Past Week- Alessandra Rizzotti wrote in News, Do and Goodest


You can learn about so many things on the internet, but how much more powerful would it be if you could also DO after you learned stuff? From living walls and folding cars to printing houses and building time machines, we have things for you to learn and do from this past week.

Let’s Learn First:

A Quick Look into the Science of Time 
The Year of the (Green) Dragon: China’s Burgeoning Environmental Movement
The Easiest New Year’s Resolution Everyone Should Do
A Tiny, Fold-up Electric Car Will Hit Streets This Year
Intermission: Fireworks in Reverse
What Do You Want to Learn in 2013? Google’s Resolution Map Could Help You Figure it Out
New Living Walls Use ‘Biological Concrete’ to Reduce CO2
This Theater Has Seats for Tweeters—So Should These Businesses
'Print Your House' Coming Soon? Architecture and Fabrication
In Search of Ed Tech Ideas that Reimagine Learning
People Are Awesome: Man Moves in With Parents So a Homeless Family Can Live in His House
This Massive Land Art Portrait Fights for Human Rights in Central America
Is the Crowd a Feasible Design Partner?
Intermission: Those Crafty Dutch To Unveil Ultra Green Route 66 of the Future
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Now, let’s DO the DOs:

Make a Promise To Yourself and Others: Order Promise Cards From “Because I Said I Would”
Rich Block, Poor Block: Find the Range of Income in Your Neighborhood
Share This Film with Someone Who Cares About the Future of Public Schools
Send a Postcard on National Opt Out Day, January 7th
When Ordering Delivery Food, Avoid Places Using Styrofoam
Help Get Car Horns on Bicycles to Prevent Accidents
Start a Campaign To Ban Plastic Bottles in Your City
Make a New Year’s UnResolution
Continue reading on good.is
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Illustration by Jessica De Jesus. Image from How to Build Plans.

The GOODEST: Our Favorite Things To Learn and Do This Past Week
Alessandra Rizzotti wrote in News, Do and Goodest

You can learn about so many things on the internet, but how much more powerful would it be if you could also DO after you learned stuff? From living walls and folding cars to printing houses and building time machines, we have things for you to learn and do from this past week.

Let’s Learn First:

Now, let’s DO the DOs:

Continue reading on good.is

Illustration by Jessica De Jesus. Image from How to Build Plans.

The GOODEST: Our Favorite Things To Learn and Do This Past Week- Alessandra Rizzotti wrote in Goodest, News and Do
You can learn about so many things on the internet, but how much more powerful would it be if you could also DO after you learned stuff? From innovative modular designs and David Lynch’s thoughts on meditation, to a crowd-sourced photo essay that we want you to submit to, here are things for you to learn and DO from this past week.

Using The Noun Project’s Iconic Design Tools for Social Change
A City Education: Learning What Idealism Looks Like in Action
Nonprofit or For-Profit? Here’s How I Decided to Go For-Profit
Why Kids Make the Best Fundraisers, and Where Adults Can Take a Cue
Stronger Together: A Photo Essay of Communities United
Innovative Product Placement Makes This Music Video a Vehicle for Good
'Django Unchained': Quentin Tarantino's Misappropriation of the N-Word
Intermission: Anti-Islamic Pastor Quieted by a Beatles-Singing Crowd
The Best in Photography: 25 Amazing Things That Happened in Photo This Year
Best of 2012: The Top Ten Sustainable Modular Products
Digging Deeper: Creativity and My First Meditation
GOOD Video: Outward Bound Takes Learning into the Wild
Please, Don’t Let Me Be Misunderstood: Architecture and Communication
The End of the World Is Real
Saving the World in the Present Tense
Re-Imagine the Gift: Give Your Time
Send Words of Support to Sandy Hook Families
Bring Back Word Up Community Bookshop
Come Together to Help Build a Slow Design Knowledge Platform
Everyone Should Make a Painting
DIY: Make an Ornament out of Recycled Goods
Sign a Pact With Your Community and Local Representatives To Improve Your Town
Continue reading on good.is

Illustration by Jessica De Jesus

The GOODEST: Our Favorite Things To Learn and Do This Past Week
Alessandra Rizzotti wrote in Goodest, News and Do

You can learn about so many things on the internet, but how much more powerful would it be if you could also DO after you learned stuff? From innovative modular designs and David Lynch’s thoughts on meditation, to a crowd-sourced photo essay that we want you to submit to, here are things for you to learn and DO from this past week.

Illustration by Jessica De Jesus

The GOODEST: Our Favorite Things to Learn and Do This Past Week- Alessandra Rizzotti wrote in Goodest, News and Do

You can learn about so many things on the internet, but how much more powerful would it be if you could also DO after you learned stuff? From inventions inspired by woodpeckers and beetles, to hosting a Secret Sandy and making a wish for the future, we have things for you to learn and DO from this past week.

Because Science Matters: A Deep Dive into the Phenomenon of Vampire Draw
The Agricultural Cliff: Farmers Are Aging, and Young People Have to Step In
A Stronger Bike Helmet, Made of Cardboard and Inspired by a Woodpecker
Landfill Harmonic: Making Music From Trash in a Paraguay Slum
RX Made: How We’re Upcycling Building Waste and Creating Jobs
School by Boat: Architect Brings Classrooms, and Healthcare, to Flood-Prone Bangladesh
Let Students Design Their Own Social Change Projects
Cheaper than Solar: Gravity-Powered Lights for the Developing World
It’s About Time: ‘The Present’ Is an Updated Time Piece for the 21st Century
How a Beetle Inspired Our Clean, Fresh Water Technology
Streetpong: Redesigning the Walk Signal
Four Ways to Find Your Work Passion(s)
Why We Can’t Ignore the Caveats to Cory Booker’s Food Stamp Challenge
Connecting Broadly Won’t Replace The Importance of Connecting Deeply
Turning Packaging from Trash to Toys
Don’t Just Talk to Kids About Violence, Help Them Take Action
Share Your Thoughts: What are the building blocks of being an engaged and active citizen?
Gift Like You Give a Damn: Host a ‘Secret Sandy’ to Help Those Affected by the Hurricane this Holiday
Join Me in Requesting ‘Garbage to Garden’ in Your City
Catalyze Innovative Education for the 21st Century
Vote for a School That Deserves $50,000
Make a Wish for the Future: What’s Yours?
Illustration by Jessica De Jesus

The GOODEST: Our Favorite Things to Learn and Do This Past Week
Alessandra Rizzotti wrote in Goodest, News and Do

You can learn about so many things on the internet, but how much more powerful would it be if you could also DO after you learned stuff? From inventions inspired by woodpeckers and beetles, to hosting a Secret Sandy and making a wish for the future, we have things for you to learn and DO from this past week.

Illustration by Jessica De Jesus

The GOODEST: Our Favorite Things to Learn and Do This Past Week- Alessandra Rizzotti wrote in Culture, News, and Do
From freestyle rapping to starting your own compost, we have things for you to learn and do from this past week.
Build a Better Home with These Alternative Construction Methods
Bus Stop Light Therapy Panels Brighten Up the Winter Doldrums
Freestyle Rap Battles Could Boost Student Creativity
This Low-Cost Camera Could Help Save Lives
Bikeshares and Liability: Answering the Sharing Economy’s Legal Questions
One Fix for Rural Indian Girls’ Drop-Out Rate: Access to Affordable Feminine Hygiene
Designing Healthy Doctors: Physicians Take Care of Us, But Who’s Taking Care of Them?
Six Ways to Build a Better Urban Garden
Curbside Composting Gains Steam in Portland, Maine
Tell Them I Built This: With Design Thinking, High Schoolers Reimagine Chicken Coops
In a Fashion-First, H&M Offers Clothing Recycling for Customers
After-school 2.0: How Technology Can Create a Learning Community
Virtual Pet Therapy: Technology Lets Hospitalized Kids Play With Cats
Infographic: The Least and Most Corrupt Governments Around the World
Gift Guide: These Fair Trade Gifts Give Back
See the full Learn/Do list on good.is
Illustration by Jessica De Jesus
The GOODEST: Our Favorite Things to Learn and Do This Past Week (11/12-11/16)

A Climate Change Call to Action
Psychoanalyze Yourself and Your Coworkers: Take the Myers-Briggs Test
Can the OWS ‘Rolling Jubilee’ Liberate Americans From Debt?
Copenhagen’s Kiddie City is Urban Shangri-La for Little People
Endangered Species: In Defense of Cursive Writing
How Will Legalization Challenge Existing Canna-Businesses?
Eat Real Food on Fridays
Illustration by Jessica De JesusOriginal Image via (cc) flickr user kevin dooley
Infographic: Climate Change and Human Responsibility
It can’t be denied any longer: Sea levels are rising, major droughts are continuing, and record hot summers are being experienced al around the world. A recent study conducted by Yale University and George Mason University finds that for the first time since the research began in 2008, the majority of Americans believe that global warming is mostly a man-made phenomenon. And as sobering images of catastrophes make headlines, people are recognizing that the effects of their actions are not just an increasing danger to the world but a direct threat to themselves and their families. 
A collaboration between GOOD and Column Five

Infographic: Climate Change and Human Responsibility

It can’t be denied any longer: Sea levels are rising, major droughts are continuing, and record hot summers are being experienced al around the world. A recent study conducted by Yale University and George Mason University finds that for the first time since the research began in 2008, the majority of Americans believe that global warming is mostly a man-made phenomenon. And as sobering images of catastrophes make headlines, people are recognizing that the effects of their actions are not just an increasing danger to the world but a direct threat to themselves and their families. 

A collaboration between GOOD and Column Five