Posts tagged living

Infographic: The Rise of Millennials Living at Home

A recent Pew Research analysis found that 21.6 million America’s young people—that’s 36 percent of Millennials (loosely categorized as those between the ages of 18 to 31)—live with their parents at home. With the highest percentage in at least four decades, the study attributed the rise to three major factors: declining employment, rising college enrollment, and declines in marriage rate. Click above to see how the changing trends in our society and economy are changing opportunities for Millennials.
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GOOD Community members Elisa Huang and Tyler Hoehne contributed in Culture, Living and Economy

Infographic: The Rise of Millennials Living at Home

A recent Pew Research analysis found that 21.6 million America’s young people—that’s 36 percent of Millennials (loosely categorized as those between the ages of 18 to 31)—live with their parents at home. With the highest percentage in at least four decades, the study attributed the rise to three major factors: declining employment, rising college enrollment, and declines in marriage rate. Click above to see how the changing trends in our society and economy are changing opportunities for Millennials.

Continue reading on good.is

GOOD Community members Elisa Huang and Tyler Hoehne contributed in Culture, Living and Economy

Organize an Office Recess and Create Your Own Game
Chloe Varelidi wrote in Play, Living and Business

When you think of our everyday endeavors and going through life as adults, we’re not really encouraged to be playful. But when we play games, we relax and become more receptive and less judgmental. Games trigger our creative juices—through solving problems, navigating complex systems and managing resources. They present us with hard problems; like solving a puzzle or defeating a boss. As players we need to be creative and come up with good ideas to solve those problems. They make us more playful in our way of being and experiencing life. Best of all, games bring us together. Go ahead, organize an office recess and create your own game—and use the toolkit at the link to help get you started.

Download the Create Your Own Game toolkit here!

Illustrations by Jessica De Jesus

9 Reasons to Celebrate Farmer’s Market Week- AmericanFarmland wrote in Health, Living and Food

"It’s local community coming together to support and nurture each other and the earth we live on."—Tomi from Homer, NY.
For every $10 spent on local food, as much as $7.80 is re-spent in the local community.
"There’s nothing better than interacting with the people that nourish your body."—L.V. of Ashtabula, OH.

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9 Reasons to Celebrate Farmer’s Market Week
AmericanFarmland wrote in Health, Living and Food

  1. "It’s local community coming together to support and nurture each other and the earth we live on."—Tomi from Homer, NY.
  2. For every $10 spent on local food, as much as $7.80 is re-spent in the local community.
  3. "There’s nothing better than interacting with the people that nourish your body."—L.V. of Ashtabula, OH.

Continue reading on good.is

Why Cities Must Allow Us to Love and Leave our Cars- Jeff Speck wrote in Health, Environment and Living

I love cars. As a teenager, I had twin subscriptions to Car & Driver and Road & Track. My chief school-bus skill was the ability to name the make and model of every vehicle that passed. Until recently, I have always owned the best-handling car I could reasonably afford. I especially love high-revving Japanese sports cars like the one I drove from Miami to Washington, D.C. when I moved here in 2003. I remember the trip lasting about six hours, assisted by a tailwind and a top-of-the-line radar detector.
But an interesting thing happened when I arrived in Washington. I found myself driving less and less, and paying more and more per mile. Aside from trips to Home Depot and the occasional country jaunt, I had no reason to break my car out of its garage. Between walking, biking, and our extensive Metro transit system, driving was rarely the most convenient choice. And the parking lot beneath my apartment building charged a small fortune in fees. Add to that the availability of ZipCar car-sharing in my neighborhood, and it soon became apparent that going car-free was the most convenient option.

Continue reading on good.is

Why Cities Must Allow Us to Love and Leave our Cars
Jeff Speck wrote in Health, Environment and Living

I love cars. As a teenager, I had twin subscriptions to Car & Driver and Road & Track. My chief school-bus skill was the ability to name the make and model of every vehicle that passed. Until recently, I have always owned the best-handling car I could reasonably afford. I especially love high-revving Japanese sports cars like the one I drove from Miami to Washington, D.C. when I moved here in 2003. I remember the trip lasting about six hours, assisted by a tailwind and a top-of-the-line radar detector.

But an interesting thing happened when I arrived in Washington. I found myself driving less and less, and paying more and more per mile. Aside from trips to Home Depot and the occasional country jaunt, I had no reason to break my car out of its garage. Between walking, biking, and our extensive Metro transit system, driving was rarely the most convenient choice. And the parking lot beneath my apartment building charged a small fortune in fees. Add to that the availability of ZipCar car-sharing in my neighborhood, and it soon became apparent that going car-free was the most convenient option.

Continue reading on good.is

Five Ways that Games are More than Just Fun- Chloe Varelidi wrote in Business, Living and Play


As a game designer, I know how creative and inspiring it can be to play. But we can all benefit from being more playful—and the act of playing a game can be more about just having fun. Ready, set, play!
They make us more social.
They empower us to be creative.
They help us develop empathy.

Continue reading on good.is

Illustration by Jessica De Jesus

Five Ways that Games are More than Just Fun
Chloe Varelidi wrote in Business, Living and Play

As a game designer, I know how creative and inspiring it can be to play. But we can all benefit from being more playful—and the act of playing a game can be more about just having fun. Ready, set, play!

  1. They make us more social.
  2. They empower us to be creative.
  3. They help us develop empathy.

Continue reading on good.is

Illustration by Jessica De Jesus

The City Social: Why Urbanism Needs To Return To Observation- Patrick McDonnell wrote in Design, Livng and Cities


I have to admit that, as a planner, there are times that I get whisked away by the elegance of drawings and the process of making them, and there are times that I feel like designers are the leaders of the free world who can grant wishes because of the way we’re able to articulate ideas on paper. But drawings, models, briefs, etc. are just artifacts—they don’t tell us shit about the complexity of human behavior. They don’t inform us about the extremely social nature of cities and what the vibe is like on the ground. About a year ago, I left my desk job at City Hall to pursue a life of observation. I wanted to see urban planning from the field, get in the mix, and leave the paper version of the city behind. I wanted to get to know Dallas by becoming a part of it, get to know my neighbors and how to use the city as a tool—that’s urbanism. Now, I work as a freelance urbanist. I’m in the city, seeing what I can see, and then finding solutions to fix the problems.

Continue reading on good.is

The City Social: Why Urbanism Needs To Return To Observation
Patrick McDonnell wrote in Design, Livng and Cities

I have to admit that, as a planner, there are times that I get whisked away by the elegance of drawings and the process of making them, and there are times that I feel like designers are the leaders of the free world who can grant wishes because of the way we’re able to articulate ideas on paper. But drawings, models, briefs, etc. are just artifacts—they don’t tell us shit about the complexity of human behavior. They don’t inform us about the extremely social nature of cities and what the vibe is like on the ground.

About a year ago, I left my desk job at City Hall to pursue a life of observation. I wanted to see urban planning from the field, get in the mix, and leave the paper version of the city behind. I wanted to get to know Dallas by becoming a part of it, get to know my neighbors and how to use the city as a tool—that’s urbanism. Now, I work as a freelance urbanist. I’m in the city, seeing what I can see, and then finding solutions to fix the problems.

Continue reading on good.is

Infographic: The State of Organics- Emily Howard and Francesca Ramos contributed in Health, Living and Food
October 2012 marked the 10th anniversary of the USDA organic seal helping to raise awareness and provide consumers with more food options. As the organics industry grows it’s becoming more common to walk into a grocery store and see organic products in the produce sections and on shelves. But even though you’ve likely seen the USDA certified organic seal, how much do you know about the product behind the label?

Start taking ownership of your health with our DIY Health Check-up.

Infographic: The State of Organics
Emily Howard and Francesca Ramos contributed in Health, Living and Food

October 2012 marked the 10th anniversary of the USDA organic seal helping to raise awareness and provide consumers with more food options. As the organics industry grows it’s becoming more common to walk into a grocery store and see organic products in the produce sections and on shelves. But even though you’ve likely seen the USDA certified organic seal, how much do you know about the product behind the label?

Start taking ownership of your health with our DIY Health Check-up.

25,000 Mornings: 8 Ways to Improve Your Morning Routine- James Clear wrote in Health, Technology and Living


You’ll wake up for about 25,000 mornings in your adult life, give or take a few. According to a report from the World Health Organization, the average life expectancy in the United States is 79 years. Most people in wealthy nations are hovering around the 80–year mark. Women in Japan has the longest, with an average life expectancy of 86 years. If we use these average life expectancy numbers and assume that your adult life starts at 18 years old, then you’ve got about 68 years as an adult (86 – 18 = 68). Perhaps you have a little less than average; a little more if you’re lucky. (68 years as an adult) x (365 days each year) = 24,820 days. 25,000 mornings. That’s what you get in your adult life. 25,000 times you get to open your eyes, face the day, and decide what to do next. I don’t know about you, but I’ve let a lot of those mornings slip by. Once I realized this, I started thinking about how I could develop a better morning routine. I still have a lot to learn, but here are some strategies that you can use to get the most out of your 25,000 mornings.

Read James’ 8 strategies for getting the most out of his morning on good.is

25,000 Mornings: 8 Ways to Improve Your Morning Routine
James Clear wrote in Health, Technology and Living

You’ll wake up for about 25,000 mornings in your adult life, give or take a few.

According to a report from the World Health Organization, the average life expectancy in the United States is 79 years. Most people in wealthy nations are hovering around the 80–year mark. Women in Japan has the longest, with an average life expectancy of 86 years.

If we use these average life expectancy numbers and assume that your adult life starts at 18 years old, then you’ve got about 68 years as an adult (86 – 18 = 68). Perhaps you have a little less than average; a little more if you’re lucky.

(68 years as an adult) x (365 days each year) = 24,820 days.

25,000 mornings.

That’s what you get in your adult life. 25,000 times you get to open your eyes, face the day, and decide what to do next. I don’t know about you, but I’ve let a lot of those mornings slip by.

Once I realized this, I started thinking about how I could develop a better morning routine. I still have a lot to learn, but here are some strategies that you can use to get the most out of your 25,000 mornings.

Read James’ 8 strategies for getting the most out of his morning on good.is

Ask the Justice Department: Open a Civil Rights Case Against George Zimmerman- Yasha Wallin posted in Living, Trayvon Martin and George Zimmerman
The most fundamental of civil rights—the right to life—was violated the night George Zimmerman stalked and then took the life of Trayvon Martin. Now, a jury has acquitted Zimmerman, but that doesn’t mean we can’t continue to demand justice for Trayvon Martin. Ask that the Department of Justice file civil rights charges against Mr. Zimmerman for this egregious violation. Sign the petition to the Attorney General Eric Holder of Department of Justice today.

Continue to moveon.org

Ask the Justice Department: Open a Civil Rights Case Against George Zimmerman
Yasha Wallin posted in Living, Trayvon Martin and George Zimmerman

The most fundamental of civil rights—the right to life—was violated the night George Zimmerman stalked and then took the life of Trayvon Martin. Now, a jury has acquitted Zimmerman, but that doesn’t mean we can’t continue to demand justice for Trayvon Martin. Ask that the Department of Justice file civil rights charges against Mr. Zimmerman for this egregious violation. Sign the petition to the Attorney General Eric Holder of Department of Justice today.

Continue to moveon.org

Generation DIY: Let’s Take Control of Our Own Health- Thea Linscott and Scott Slater contributed in Health, Living and Diy


What if, as a generation of DIYers, we made wellness our most important project? 
If you are like most young adult know-it-alls, you have ignored warning signs—so where do you start? It’s overwhelming, and you’re freaked out. Start with the basics in this DIY project: eat something—anything—healthy, get moderately physical or even ask for someone you trust for help. Making a doctor’s appointment can be the first step in taking control of your own wellness project. You are probably thinking this is an expensive undertaking, with or without insurance, but in the long-run, this could actually save you a lot of money, time and stress. And then you can go crazy, research best practices, vote for stronger healthcare policies, and choose stronger local and federal leadership. 

Continue reading on good.is

Generation DIY: Let’s Take Control of Our Own Health
Thea Linscott and Scott Slater contributed in Health, Living and Diy

What if, as a generation of DIYers, we made wellness our most important project? 

If you are like most young adult know-it-alls, you have ignored warning signs—so where do you start? It’s overwhelming, and you’re freaked out. Start with the basics in this DIY project: eat something—anything—healthy, get moderately physical or even ask for someone you trust for help. Making a doctor’s appointment can be the first step in taking control of your own wellness project. You are probably thinking this is an expensive undertaking, with or without insurance, but in the long-run, this could actually save you a lot of money, time and stress. And then you can go crazy, research best practices, vote for stronger healthcare policies, and choose stronger local and federal leadership. 

Continue reading on good.is

Exploring Invisible Architecture: Morocco’s Answer to the High Line- Shelley Hornstein wrote in Living, Architecture and Creativity
Sometimes the most interesting explorations can be found through what I call “invisible architecture” or the discovery of what exists in the city but was once hidden to the naked eye. We’ve seen people discovering the formerly “invisible” in recent projects like the High Line in New York, which was always there, in a sense, but was just waiting to be discovered. At the same time, another invisible architecture project emerged, but in Fez, Morocco, and it calls upon visitors to look down and around rather than up and out.
The Fez River Project, spearheaded by award-winning architect Aziza Chaouni and her Bureau of Ecological Architecture & Systems of Tomorrow (Bureau EAST, now Aziza Chaouni Projects), revitalized the city by restoring and uncovering the Fez River, which runs through its center. Although the dense and labyrinthine medina of Fez has been a Unesco Heritage Site since 1981, the river was hidden under concrete until Chaouni’s project was unveiled (literally!) in 2008.
Continue reading on good.is

Exploring Invisible Architecture: Morocco’s Answer to the High Line
Shelley Hornstein wrote in Living, Architecture and Creativity

Sometimes the most interesting explorations can be found through what I call “invisible architecture” or the discovery of what exists in the city but was once hidden to the naked eye. We’ve seen people discovering the formerly “invisible” in recent projects like the High Line in New York, which was always there, in a sense, but was just waiting to be discovered. At the same time, another invisible architecture project emerged, but in Fez, Morocco, and it calls upon visitors to look down and around rather than up and out.

The Fez River Project, spearheaded by award-winning architect Aziza Chaouni and her Bureau of Ecological Architecture & Systems of Tomorrow (Bureau EAST, now Aziza Chaouni Projects), revitalized the city by restoring and uncovering the Fez River, which runs through its center. Although the dense and labyrinthine medina of Fez has been a Unesco Heritage Site since 1981, the river was hidden under concrete until Chaouni’s project was unveiled (literally!) in 2008.

Continue reading on good.is

How to Photograph Fireworks: Tips From National Geographic Photographers- Yasha Wallin posted in Creativity, Living and Photography
National Geographic’s photographers share their tips on how to take the best photos of fireworks for the upcoming holiday. Read on for advice like: “The long exposures required for firework photography mean slow shutter speeds. Keep your camera motionless by using a sturdy tripod and a shutter release cord. When shooting a scene that includes not just the sky but also other elements like a cityscape, keeping the horizon line straight is particularly important.”

Continue to nationalgeographic.com

How to Photograph Fireworks: Tips From National Geographic Photographers
Yasha Wallin posted in Creativity, Living and Photography

National Geographic’s photographers share their tips on how to take the best photos of fireworks for the upcoming holiday. Read on for advice like: “The long exposures required for firework photography mean slow shutter speeds. Keep your camera motionless by using a sturdy tripod and a shutter release cord. When shooting a scene that includes not just the sky but also other elements like a cityscape, keeping the horizon line straight is particularly important.”

Continue to nationalgeographic.com

To Your Health: Let’s Tackle Well-Being With DIY Spirit- GOOD HQ wrote in Health and Living
Ancient Greek physician Herophilos was on to something with these words of wisdom: “When health is absent, wisdom cannot reveal itself, art cannot manifest, strength cannot fight, wealth becomes useless, and intelligence cannot be applied.”
For July, we have decided to put the GOOD focus on the subject of health—from ways you can take better control over your personal health, to ways we can collectively help improve community and global health.
Continue reading on good.is
Illustration by Corinna Loo

To Your Health: Let’s Tackle Well-Being With DIY Spirit
GOOD HQ wrote in Health and Living

Ancient Greek physician Herophilos was on to something with these words of wisdom: “When health is absent, wisdom cannot reveal itself, art cannot manifest, strength cannot fight, wealth becomes useless, and intelligence cannot be applied.”

For July, we have decided to put the GOOD focus on the subject of health—from ways you can take better control over your personal health, to ways we can collectively help improve community and global health.

Continue reading on good.is

Illustration by Corinna Loo

Six Things We Learned From Patagonia’s Founder Yvon Chouinard- Emily Anderson and Yasha Wallin wrote in Living, Surfing and Yvon Chouinard


Yvon Chouinard has been wearing the same flannel shirt for 20 years. The 74-year-old conservationist, out-of-the-box thinker, athlete, and craftsman is also a business leader who is always pushing Patagonia, the company he founded, to find solutions to the global environmental crisis. We asked Chouinard what he thinks his legacy will be—turns out he “couldn’t really care less.” But we speculate it will be measured not by what he encourages (be in nature, be personally responsible, simplify) but by what he hopes we discourages (buying, spending, polluting). In short, Chouinard wants us to stop being consumers and start being thoughtful global citizens. Below are the five life lessons we learned from the avid explorer. 

Continue reading on good.is

Six Things We Learned From Patagonia’s Founder Yvon Chouinard
Emily Anderson and Yasha Wallin wrote in Living, Surfing and Yvon Chouinard

Yvon Chouinard has been wearing the same flannel shirt for 20 years. The 74-year-old conservationist, out-of-the-box thinker, athlete, and craftsman is also a business leader who is always pushing Patagonia, the company he founded, to find solutions to the global environmental crisis. We asked Chouinard what he thinks his legacy will be—turns out he “couldn’t really care less.” But we speculate it will be measured not by what he encourages (be in nature, be personally responsible, simplify) but by what he hopes we discourages (buying, spending, polluting). In short, Chouinard wants us to stop being consumers and start being thoughtful global citizens. Below are the five life lessons we learned from the avid explorer. 

Continue reading on good.is

Snoop Lion on Gun Control: End the Violence, Move Forward in Peace and Love- Snoop Lion wrote in Living, Music and Creativity


Growing up in the streets of Long Beach, I’ve seen lots of homies fall victim to gun violence. Whether they were the ones behind the barrel or in front, in the end it never worked out. As I hear more and more stories in the news about violent acts of terror and school shootings that leave innocent kids dead, it makes me upset to live in a world full of negativity. Now more than ever, I feel the need to speak up and encourage our youth to come together to stop gun violence. That’s why I started my “No Guns Allowed” movement, inspired by my song of the same name that features my nephew Drake and my daughter, Cori B.

Continue reading on good.is

Snoop Lion on Gun Control: End the Violence, Move Forward in Peace and Love
Snoop Lion wrote in Living, Music and Creativity

Growing up in the streets of Long Beach, I’ve seen lots of homies fall victim to gun violence. Whether they were the ones behind the barrel or in front, in the end it never worked out. As I hear more and more stories in the news about violent acts of terror and school shootings that leave innocent kids dead, it makes me upset to live in a world full of negativity. Now more than ever, I feel the need to speak up and encourage our youth to come together to stop gun violence. That’s why I started my “No Guns Allowed” movement, inspired by my song of the same name that features my nephew Drake and my daughter, Cori B.

Continue reading on good.is