Posts tagged gay rights

UPS Stops Donating to Boy Scouts Because Ban on Gay Scouts and Leaders

Props to UPS Foundation for standing against discrimination. The UPS Foundation seeks to support organizations that are in alignment with our focus areas, guidelines, and non-discrimination policy. UPS and The UPS Foundation do not discriminate against any person or organization with regard to categories protected by applicable law, as well as other categories protected by UPS and The UPS Foundation in our own policies.

Thanks, Kuzie

UPS Stops Donating to Boy Scouts Because Ban on Gay Scouts and Leaders

Props to UPS Foundation for standing against discrimination. The UPS Foundation seeks to support organizations that are in alignment with our focus areas, guidelines, and non-discrimination policy. UPS and The UPS Foundation do not discriminate against any person or organization with regard to categories protected by applicable law, as well as other categories protected by UPS and The UPS Foundation in our own policies.

Thanks, Kuzie

Infographic: Pride Parades Around the World
In honor of pride month, here’s a look at the state of the pride parade around the globe. Which countries celebrate openly? And which countries force gay communities to embrace their identities in the dark?
Take a look at GOOD.is

Infographic: Pride Parades Around the World

In honor of pride month, here’s a look at the state of the pride parade around the globe. Which countries celebrate openly? And which countries force gay communities to embrace their identities in the dark?

Take a look at GOOD.is

The Obama Effect: Why More Black Voters Are Turning Gay-Friendly
Since President Obama came out in favor of gay marriage a couple of weeks ago, there’s been a noticeable shift in black Americans’ opinion on gay marriage. A new Washington Post-ABC survey found that 59 percent of black people now say they support same-sex marriage—an 18 point jump since Obama’s announcement.
Learn more about “The Obama Effect” on GOOD.is

The Obama Effect: Why More Black Voters Are Turning Gay-Friendly

Since President Obama came out in favor of gay marriage a couple of weeks ago, there’s been a noticeable shift in black Americans’ opinion on gay marriage. A new Washington Post-ABC survey found that 59 percent of black people now say they support same-sex marriage—an 18 point jump since Obama’s announcement.

Learn more about “The Obama Effect” on GOOD.is

If you’ve been on the internet in the last two days, you may be aware that many people aren’t too happy about North Carolina voters’ decision to approve a constitutional amendment that strengthens the state’s existing ban on gay marriage. And true to internet form, that sentiment resulted in plenty of memes, quotes, tweets, and GIFs.  
Above is one form of expression we see all too often: the old image comparison, juxtaposing how it was then to how it is now and dismissing all the time in between as irrelevant. Then. Now. Bad. Still bad.
These particular photos compare a decades-old protest against interracial marriages at the North Carolina state capitol with a days-old demonstration (I assume, anyway; one problem with these image mashups is that you lose the information about each photo) against same-sex ones in the same spot. But the general theme is not new: Every time a case of social injustice bubbles up in the internet age, we find ourselves making these comparisons. Comb the archives of news sites, then attach that archived image to the contemporary one. The message is one of two things: Either things are wildly different—worse, that is—than they used to be, or they are just as terrible as they were. In either situation, the underlying point is the same: We really fucked up, and it’s simple to see how and why.
Read more on GOOD→

If you’ve been on the internet in the last two days, you may be aware that many people aren’t too happy about North Carolina voters’ decision to approve a constitutional amendment that strengthens the state’s existing ban on gay marriage. And true to internet form, that sentiment resulted in plenty of memes, quotes, tweets, and GIFs.  

Above is one form of expression we see all too often: the old image comparison, juxtaposing how it was then to how it is now and dismissing all the time in between as irrelevant. Then. Now. Bad. Still bad.

These particular photos compare a decades-old protest against interracial marriages at the North Carolina state capitol with a days-old demonstration (I assume, anyway; one problem with these image mashups is that you lose the information about each photo) against same-sex ones in the same spot. But the general theme is not new: Every time a case of social injustice bubbles up in the internet age, we find ourselves making these comparisons. Comb the archives of news sites, then attach that archived image to the contemporary one. The message is one of two things: Either things are wildly different—worse, that is—than they used to be, or they are just as terrible as they were. In either situation, the underlying point is the same: We really fucked up, and it’s simple to see how and why.

Read more on GOOD→

sunfoundation:

Gay rights in the US, state by state
Gay rights laws in America have evolved to allow — but in some cases ban — rights for gay, lesbian and transgender people on a range of issues, including marriage, hospital visitation, adoption, housing, employment and school bullying. The handling of gay rights issues vary by state and follow trends by region.

sunfoundation:

Gay rights in the US, state by state

Gay rights laws in America have evolved to allow — but in some cases ban — rights for gay, lesbian and transgender people on a range of issues, including marriage, hospital visitation, adoption, housing, employment and school bullying. The handling of gay rights issues vary by state and follow trends by region.

(via ilovecharts)

This week, yet another bullied gay teen took his own life. Here’s why—and how—this has to stop.

This week, yet another bullied gay teen took his own life. Here’s why—and how—this has to stop.

La Cage aux Jim Crow: The New Bill That Would Shut Gays Out of Society
This shocking new New Hampshire bill that would allow business to refuse service to gays is basically neo-Jim Crow. 

The House judiciary committee of the New Hampshire state legislature convened to discuss a bill that would allow businesses to refuse accommodations, goods, or services to gays getting married. New Hampshire legalized same-sex marriage in 2010, though with the caveat that churches and other religious groups could refuse to participate in same-sex ceremonies. The new bill would take that rule a step further, allowing a bakery to refuse to bake a wedding cake for a gay couple, for instance.

Read more on GOOD→ 

La Cage aux Jim Crow: The New Bill That Would Shut Gays Out of Society

This shocking new New Hampshire bill that would allow business to refuse service to gays is basically neo-Jim Crow. 

The House judiciary committee of the New Hampshire state legislature convened to discuss a bill that would allow businesses to refuse accommodations, goods, or services to gays getting married. New Hampshire legalized same-sex marriage in 2010, though with the caveat that churches and other religious groups could refuse to participate in same-sex ceremonies. The new bill would take that rule a step further, allowing a bakery to refuse to bake a wedding cake for a gay couple, for instance.

Read more on GOOD→ 

columnfive:


In June, New York became the largest state to legalize same-sex marriage. Here’s a look at how attitudes toward marriage are changing across the nation.

 (Click on the title above to learn more.)
Via  Column Five  for Good.is

columnfive:

In June, New York became the largest state to legalize same-sex marriage. Here’s a look at how attitudes toward marriage are changing across the nation.


(Click on the title above to learn more.)

Via Column Five for Good.is