Posts tagged food

Welcome to the United States of Good Sandwiches
What kind of sandwich are you having for lunch?
This is one of the most interesting online interactive campaigns we’ve seen that aims to protect our planet Earth. Check out how The Climate Reality Project is creatively engaging people to sign petitions on whatilove.org.
Posted by GOOD community member, Jeff Oeth in  Environment, Nature and Food

This is one of the most interesting online interactive campaigns we’ve seen that aims to protect our planet Earth. Check out how The Climate Reality Project is creatively engaging people to sign petitions on whatilove.org.

Posted by GOOD community member, Jeff Oeth in Environment, Nature and Food

9 Reasons to Celebrate Farmer’s Market Week- AmericanFarmland wrote in Health, Living and Food

"It’s local community coming together to support and nurture each other and the earth we live on."—Tomi from Homer, NY.
For every $10 spent on local food, as much as $7.80 is re-spent in the local community.
"There’s nothing better than interacting with the people that nourish your body."—L.V. of Ashtabula, OH.

Continue reading on good.is

9 Reasons to Celebrate Farmer’s Market Week
AmericanFarmland wrote in Health, Living and Food

  1. "It’s local community coming together to support and nurture each other and the earth we live on."—Tomi from Homer, NY.
  2. For every $10 spent on local food, as much as $7.80 is re-spent in the local community.
  3. "There’s nothing better than interacting with the people that nourish your body."—L.V. of Ashtabula, OH.

Continue reading on good.is

Infographic: The State of Organics- Emily Howard and Francesca Ramos contributed in Health, Living and Food
October 2012 marked the 10th anniversary of the USDA organic seal helping to raise awareness and provide consumers with more food options. As the organics industry grows it’s becoming more common to walk into a grocery store and see organic products in the produce sections and on shelves. But even though you’ve likely seen the USDA certified organic seal, how much do you know about the product behind the label?

Start taking ownership of your health with our DIY Health Check-up.

Infographic: The State of Organics
Emily Howard and Francesca Ramos contributed in Health, Living and Food

October 2012 marked the 10th anniversary of the USDA organic seal helping to raise awareness and provide consumers with more food options. As the organics industry grows it’s becoming more common to walk into a grocery store and see organic products in the produce sections and on shelves. But even though you’ve likely seen the USDA certified organic seal, how much do you know about the product behind the label?

Start taking ownership of your health with our DIY Health Check-up.

Creative Mornings: Masterpieces You Can Eat for Breakfast- Yasha Wallin wrote in Food, Art and Photography

Ida Skivenes likes to play with her food. And lucky for us, because the Oslo, Norway-based artist crafts the most stunning homages to modern art through a few simple ingredients and a lot of detail. For her “Art Toast Project,” she’s been remaking some of the world’s most famous works of art in a unique medium: jam, cheese, peanut butter, and other food stuffs using toast as her canvas.
In this ongoing project, with new work posted on her Instagram account regularly, she attempts to make art more accessible to the public, and perhaps play on the concept of “food porn” that so many Instagrammers flood their feeds with. The artist explains, “What inspired me initially was the literal meaning of ‘food art,’ in that one creates artworks with food. So I combined that with my personal interest in modern art and set out to see if it was possible to recreate famous painters masterpieces without dishonoring them completely. It’s a way of sharing my love of both food and art together.”

Continue reading on good.is

Creative Mornings: Masterpieces You Can Eat for Breakfast
Yasha Wallin wrote in Food, Art and Photography

Ida Skivenes likes to play with her food. And lucky for us, because the Oslo, Norway-based artist crafts the most stunning homages to modern art through a few simple ingredients and a lot of detail. For her “Art Toast Project,” she’s been remaking some of the world’s most famous works of art in a unique medium: jam, cheese, peanut butter, and other food stuffs using toast as her canvas.

In this ongoing project, with new work posted on her Instagram account regularly, she attempts to make art more accessible to the public, and perhaps play on the concept of “food porn” that so many Instagrammers flood their feeds with. The artist explains, “What inspired me initially was the literal meaning of ‘food art,’ in that one creates artworks with food. So I combined that with my personal interest in modern art and set out to see if it was possible to recreate famous painters masterpieces without dishonoring them completely. It’s a way of sharing my love of both food and art together.”

Continue reading on good.is


Why We’ve Turned our Apartment Into a Part-time Restaurant- Emily Coates wrote in Food, New York City and Brooklyn

For the past two years, on (almost) every fourth Saturday of the month, our apartment turns into a part-time restaurant. Sixteen to 20 people show up at our gate over by the Domino Sugar Factory, tucked under the Williamsburg Bridge, to eat with people they’ve never met. We call it Neighbor.
The first dinner was nerve wracking. We spent all week preparing. We went through the schedule over and over and over and over again. We worried about everything. Who would come? Will they think it’s weird? Will they like the food?

Continue reading on good.is

Why We’ve Turned our Apartment Into a Part-time Restaurant
Emily Coates wrote in Food, New York City and Brooklyn

For the past two years, on (almost) every fourth Saturday of the month, our apartment turns into a part-time restaurant. Sixteen to 20 people show up at our gate over by the Domino Sugar Factory, tucked under the Williamsburg Bridge, to eat with people they’ve never met. We call it Neighbor.

The first dinner was nerve wracking. We spent all week preparing. We went through the schedule over and over and over and over again. We worried about everything. Who would come? Will they think it’s weird? Will they like the food?

Continue reading on good.is


Citizenship Building Block #11: Learn to Cook a Dish With a Story- Lara Rabinovitch in Living, Food and Building Blocks Of Citizenship
Food is a window into culture. Learning to cook a dish from your heritage will make you a better global citizen by enriching your mind—and belly. So this month spend some time with a grandmother and learn how to cook a dish she knows well. This may be with your grandmother, someone else’s grandmother, or your grandfather—because he’s the cook of the family. Whether it’s Japanese rice balls, Brazilian feijoada, Ukrainian varenyky, or curry vindaloo, learn how to make at least one dish from one part of your heritage. It might be tuna casserole or tamales or thin-crust pizza. Either way: take notes, ask questions, and taste. You’ll learn how to make something to share with others while also reconnecting with a part of your past. Think of it as culinary archaeology, only tastier.
Add this to your To-Do List

Citizenship Building Block #11: Learn to Cook a Dish With a Story
Lara Rabinovitch in Living, Food and Building Blocks Of Citizenship

Food is a window into culture. Learning to cook a dish from your heritage will make you a better global citizen by enriching your mind—and belly. So this month spend some time with a grandmother and learn how to cook a dish she knows well. This may be with your grandmother, someone else’s grandmother, or your grandfather—because he’s the cook of the family. Whether it’s Japanese rice balls, Brazilian feijoada, Ukrainian varenyky, or curry vindaloo, learn how to make at least one dish from one part of your heritage. It might be tuna casserole or tamales or thin-crust pizza. Either way: take notes, ask questions, and taste. You’ll learn how to make something to share with others while also reconnecting with a part of your past. Think of it as culinary archaeology, only tastier.

Add this to your To-Do List


This Vending Machine Serves Up Fresh-Squeezed Juice- Adele Peters posted in Food, Health and Juice
Step aside, candy bars. LA’s newest vending machine—technically, a “juice ATM,” serves fresh juices 24/7. Like the Sprinkles Cupcake ATM, but quite a bit healthier.
Continue to designtaxi.com

This Vending Machine Serves Up Fresh-Squeezed Juice
Adele Peters posted in Food, Health and Juice

Step aside, candy bars. LA’s newest vending machine—technically, a “juice ATM,” serves fresh juices 24/7. Like the Sprinkles Cupcake ATM, but quite a bit healthier.

Continue to designtaxi.com

Push for Good: This Week’s Guide to Crowdfunding Creative Progress- Alessandra Rizzotti wrote in Environment, Culture and Food
Innovation makes the world go around, so why not crowdfund it? The best thinkers and ideamakers are the those that can make collective progress, so if we support their causes, projects, and ideas, we can be a part of bettering the future of our planet.
Maybe you don’t know what causes you care about yet, or maybe you’re still searching. Consider this a guide of the goodness you can get behind. Take a look at GOOD’s curated Kickstarter page, which we’ll be updating regularly, and check back every Saturday for a round up of our favorite projects from the crowdfunding world.
13 Days to Go: Public Coffee: A Vehicle for Conversation
24 Days to Go: Little Creek Oyster Ranch
35 Days to Go: Solecan: A Possible Solution for Recycling
Now to share some successes…
0 Days to Go: Save Adobe Books
0 Seconds to Go: Organic, Sustainable Sauces by Saucee
Continue reading on good.is
Tell us what projects you’re getting behind in the comments below. Push progress forward, and do it for our collective good.
Click here to add crowdfunding projects you can care about to your To-Do list.

Push for Good: This Week’s Guide to Crowdfunding Creative Progress
Alessandra Rizzotti wrote in Environment, Culture and Food

Innovation makes the world go around, so why not crowdfund it? The best thinkers and ideamakers are the those that can make collective progress, so if we support their causes, projects, and ideas, we can be a part of bettering the future of our planet.

Maybe you don’t know what causes you care about yet, or maybe you’re still searching. Consider this a guide of the goodness you can get behind. Take a look at GOOD’s curated Kickstarter page, which we’ll be updating regularly, and check back every Saturday for a round up of our favorite projects from the crowdfunding world.

Now to share some successes…

Continue reading on good.is

Tell us what projects you’re getting behind in the comments below. Push progress forward, and do it for our collective good.

Click here to add crowdfunding projects you can care about to your To-Do list.

The Plate Project: What Will We Be Eating in 35 Years?- Adele Peters posted in Food, Design and Future

Food & Wine asked designers and foodies to sketch out their vision of the food of the future on paper plates.
Continue to foodandwine.com

The Plate Project: What Will We Be Eating in 35 Years?
Adele Peters posted in Food, Design and Future

Food & Wine asked designers and foodies to sketch out their vision of the food of the future on paper plates.

Continue to foodandwine.com


From Farm Straight to the Trash: Why We Need Innovative Food Waste Solutions Right Now- Peter Lehner wrote in Environment, Food and Waste


Forty percent of the food in this country—almost half—is never eaten. We know we can reduce this waste once we put our minds to it.  We’ve done it already, with great success, with energy. Governments, working with and encouraged by advocacy groups, designed programs to educate consumers and to prod manufacturers to design better products—light bulbs, refrigerators, cars—that made saving energy easier. Activists and innovators are just starting to develop solutions for food waste. We need a similar movement to build momentum behind these efforts and start bringing these solutions, literally, to the table. And to farms, stores, restaurants and dining services everywhere.

Continue reading on good.is
This month, we’re challenging the GOOD community to host a dinner party and cook a meal that contains fewer ingredients than the number of people on the guest list. Throughout March, we’ll share ideas and resources for being more conscious about our food and food systems. Join the conversation at good.is/food and on Twitter at #chewonit.

From Farm Straight to the Trash: Why We Need Innovative Food Waste Solutions Right Now
Peter Lehner wrote in Environment, Food and Waste

Forty percent of the food in this country—almost half—is never eaten. We know we can reduce this waste once we put our minds to it.  We’ve done it already, with great success, with energy. Governments, working with and encouraged by advocacy groups, designed programs to educate consumers and to prod manufacturers to design better products—light bulbs, refrigerators, cars—that made saving energy easier. Activists and innovators are just starting to develop solutions for food waste. We need a similar movement to build momentum behind these efforts and start bringing these solutions, literally, to the table. And to farms, stores, restaurants and dining services everywhere.

Continue reading on good.is

This month, we’re challenging the GOOD community to host a dinner party and cook a meal that contains fewer ingredients than the number of people on the guest list. Throughout March, we’ll share ideas and resources for being more conscious about our food and food systems. Join the conversation at good.is/food and on Twitter at #chewonit.

Are stress and time-crunched days resulting in the more-than-occasional cold pizza breakfast or bowl of cereal dinner? Perhaps it’s time to freshen up your diet. In the GOOD Guide to Healthy Living & Eating, we outline all kinds of healthy and delicious ways to make sure you’ll get more nourishing meals in your life.

Because half the battle is just getting the good stuff on your plate, learn how to find (and afford) the most delectable fruits and veggies at the farmers’ market, keep them fresher for longer, and then get ideas for stretching one tasty, nutrient-packed ingredient into five different dishes. And, because most of us are parked on our caboose in front of a computer for hours a day, we even have the stretches and snacks that will allow you to extend your newly found healthy habits right on into your office.

Illustrations by Matt Chase

US Food Administration PSA from Nearly 100 Years Ago Still Rings True- Haley Scott posted in Food, Sustainable and Brown
Push for Good: This Week’s Guide to Crowdfunding Creative Progress- Alessandra Rizzotti wrote in Push For Good, News and Food

Innovation makes the world go around, so why not crowdfund it? The best thinkers and ideamakers are the those that can make collective progress, so if we support their causes, projects, and ideas, we can be a part of bettering the future of our planet.
Maybe you don’t know what causes you care about yet, or maybe you’re still searching. Consider this a guide of the goodness you can get behind. Take a look at GOOD’s curated Kickstarter page, which we’ll be updating regularly, and check back every week for a round up of our favorite projects from the crowdfunding world.

LoGROcal: A Sustainable Mushroom Farm (ends today)
A Lab-on-Wheels for Science Education (2 days)
Grow Jar (7 days)
Rocket Mass Heaters: The DVD (7 days)
GrowUp!: An Aquaponic Urban Farm for London (16 days)
Pedal Pops: A Gourmet Popsicle Bike Cart (22 days)
Continue reading on good.is for more details

IIllustration by Jessica De Jesus

Push for Good: This Week’s Guide to Crowdfunding Creative Progress
Alessandra Rizzotti wrote in Push For GoodNews and Food

Innovation makes the world go around, so why not crowdfund it? The best thinkers and ideamakers are the those that can make collective progress, so if we support their causes, projects, and ideas, we can be a part of bettering the future of our planet.

Maybe you don’t know what causes you care about yet, or maybe you’re still searching. Consider this a guide of the goodness you can get behind. Take a look at GOOD’s curated Kickstarter page, which we’ll be updating regularly, and check back every week for a round up of our favorite projects from the crowdfunding world.

Continue reading on good.is for more details

IIllustration by Jessica De Jesus

Infographic: How Do You Know if Antibiotics Are in Your Meat?- Column Five wrote in Food, Infographic and Lifestyle
According to the Food and Drug Administration, approximately 80 percent of all antibiotics sold in the U.S. are given to livestock to promote faster growth and to prevent and treat disease. Mounting evidence now reveals that this widespread use of antibiotics, coupled with overuse and misuse of the drugs for human treatment has resulted in a new millennium health threat: a bacterial superbug resistant to antibiotics. Click on the infographic above to learn more about how antibiotics enter the food system and how you can help identify if they are in your meat.

Infographic: How Do You Know if Antibiotics Are in Your Meat?
Column Five wrote in Food, Infographic and Lifestyle

According to the Food and Drug Administration, approximately 80 percent of all antibiotics sold in the U.S. are given to livestock to promote faster growth and to prevent and treat disease. Mounting evidence now reveals that this widespread use of antibiotics, coupled with overuse and misuse of the drugs for human treatment has resulted in a new millennium health threat: a bacterial superbug resistant to antibiotics. Click on the infographic above to learn more about how antibiotics enter the food system and how you can help identify if they are in your meat.