Posts tagged food

Heaven Can Wait (1978)
In the 1970s, a movie character drinking a shake made of whipped liver, alfalfa sprouts, bean curd, and spinach just had to be from Los Angeles. So was the case with LA Rams quarterback Joe Pendleton (Warren Beatty), who consumes one of these potent potions before an overeager angel preemptively books him a one-way ticket to the pearly gates—even though the gridiron great hadn’t actually died. Thirty-five years later, protein shakes account for nearly 50 percent of the sports nutrition market, proving that the titular character of Heaven Can Wait was ahead of his time in more ways than one.

Heaven Can Wait (1978)

In the 1970s, a movie character drinking a shake made of whipped liver, alfalfa sprouts, bean curd, and spinach just had to be from Los Angeles. So was the case with LA Rams quarterback Joe Pendleton (Warren Beatty), who consumes one of these potent potions before an overeager angel preemptively books him a one-way ticket to the pearly gates—even though the gridiron great hadn’t actually died. Thirty-five years later, protein shakes account for nearly 50 percent of the sports nutrition market, proving that the titular character of Heaven Can Wait was ahead of his time in more ways than one.

Three’s Company (1977-84)
Before Jack Tripper (John Ritter), people would look at you twice if you were an American male chef. Nowadays, Michael Voltaggio, Curtis Stone, and Spike Mendelsohn make it easy to forget that Tripper was deconstructing culinary conversations around gender—not to mention, regaling his two female roommates with chauvinistic repartee more than 30 years ago.

Three’s Company (1977-84)

Before Jack Tripper (John Ritter), people would look at you twice if you were an American male chef. Nowadays, Michael Voltaggio, Curtis Stone, and Spike Mendelsohn make it easy to forget that Tripper was deconstructing culinary conversations around gender—not to mention, regaling his two female roommates with chauvinistic repartee more than 30 years ago.

Gilligan’s Island
Long before vegan cupcake shops populated the American landscape with their agave-sweetened, faux-bacon crumble topping, Mary Ann Summers (Dawn Wells) turned the tropical bounty surrounding her into Gilligan’s (Bob Denver) favorite desert isle dessert. The irresistible appeal of Mary Ann’s vegan coconut cream pie became a running gag on the show, though it would’ve never occurred to the modest Winfield, Kan., farm girl to blog about her recipe.

Gilligan’s Island

Long before vegan cupcake shops populated the American landscape with their agave-sweetened, faux-bacon crumble topping, Mary Ann Summers (Dawn Wells) turned the tropical bounty surrounding her into Gilligan’s (Bob Denver) favorite desert isle dessert. The irresistible appeal of Mary Ann’s vegan coconut cream pie became a running gag on the show, though it would’ve never occurred to the modest Winfield, Kan., farm girl to blog about her recipe.

The Beverly Hillbillies (1962-71)
Though her Beverly Hills neighbors were left nonplussed, Granny Moses (Irene Ryan), the beloved matriarch of the Clampett clan, was way ahead of today’s 100-mile diet trend. Her boiled buzzard, gopher gravy and possum pot pie ingredients were sourced straight from the backyard. Now that is local.

The Beverly Hillbillies (1962-71)

Though her Beverly Hills neighbors were left nonplussed, Granny Moses (Irene Ryan), the beloved matriarch of the Clampett clan, was way ahead of today’s 100-mile diet trend. Her boiled buzzard, gopher gravy and possum pot pie ingredients were sourced straight from the backyard. Now that is local.

Your Show of Shows (1950-54)
Years before Nordic food genius René Redzepi shocked the world with edible floral arrangements and meals made of seaweed and vegetables he discovered near his Copenhagen restaurant, Charles (Sid Caesar) discovered the joys of foraging at the table while eating at a “Health Food” restaurant with his doting wife, Doris (Imogene Coca). And to think, he didn’t even have to wait six months for a reservation.

Your Show of Shows (1950-54)

Years before Nordic food genius René Redzepi shocked the world with edible floral arrangements and meals made of seaweed and vegetables he discovered near his Copenhagen restaurant, Charles (Sid Caesar) discovered the joys of foraging at the table while eating at a “Health Food” restaurant with his doting wife, Doris (Imogene Coca). And to think, he didn’t even have to wait six months for a reservation.

Dana Goodyear reimagines a Big Mac. The patty is made from mushrooms, beets, edamame, and bread crumbs. The meat is the sauce. Pretty impressive idea for fifteen minutes of work. 
#HalfBakedDesignChallenge
Illustrations by Kate Bingaman-Burt

Dana Goodyear reimagines a Big Mac. The patty is made from mushrooms, beets, edamame, and bread crumbs. The meat is the sauce. Pretty impressive idea for fifteen minutes of work. 

#HalfBakedDesignChallenge

Illustrations by Kate Bingaman-Burt

Excited to announce that this week we’re handing over our Instagram feed to hedley and bennett!

Excited to announce that this week we’re handing over our Instagram feed to hedley and bennett!

luckypeach:

What role does the law play in regulating taste? According to some aficionados, and plenty of hawkers the world over, the fewer regulations governing street-side food vending the better (or as one prominent LA restaurant critic told me: the best tacos in town are in Tijuana). Unregulated street food meccas like Rio de Janeiro and Mexico City certainly support this theory. But in places like Singapore and Portland, Oregon, where strict rules govern but encourage vending, the street food remains top-notch.
Laws can both help or hinder the business as well as the quality and diversity of the offerings, depending on whose interests are prioritized. Implementation and enforcement in different cities often fluctuates, too, depending on neighborhood, time of day, political climate, type of vendor, and the whims of authority figures. Even Chicago’s famous hot dogs are actually illegal to sell on the street (sausage-vending permits exist, but only for park grounds). Most vendors just ignore or remain unaware of the city’s arcane and largely unenforced laws governing the sale of cooked or prepared food on the sidewalks. Back in 1997, Windy City health inspectors ignited the “elote wars” labor dispute by cracking down and dousing bleach on the tropical fruit salads and barbecued corn ears of unsuspecting food carts in a random effort to clamp down on illegal hawkers.
Street food vending can be risky business, and the relationship between the law and street food is a complicated one. The chart here won’t necessarily clarify what sort of legislation allows for maximum tastiness. Rather, it demonstrates that what’s strictly legal (or illegal) doesn’t dictate the reality on the streets. Like heat-resistant microorganisms growing in a sunless hydrothermal vent, street food can persist even in the most seemingly inhospitable environments.
Lara Rabinovitch is a historian and writer living in Los Angeles. She’s working on a book about pastrami and the people who brought it to North America.  
Illustrated and designed by Helen Tseng

luckypeach:

What role does the law play in regulating taste? According to some aficionados, and plenty of hawkers the world over, the fewer regulations governing street-side food vending the better (or as one prominent LA restaurant critic told me: the best tacos in town are in Tijuana). Unregulated street food meccas like Rio de Janeiro and Mexico City certainly support this theory. But in places like Singapore and Portland, Oregon, where strict rules govern but encourage vending, the street food remains top-notch.

Laws can both help or hinder the business as well as the quality and diversity of the offerings, depending on whose interests are prioritized. Implementation and enforcement in different cities often fluctuates, too, depending on neighborhood, time of day, political climate, type of vendor, and the whims of authority figures. Even Chicagos famous hot dogs are actually illegal to sell on the street (sausage-vending permits exist, but only for park grounds). Most vendors just ignore or remain unaware of the citys arcane and largely unenforced laws governing the sale of cooked or prepared food on the sidewalks. Back in 1997, Windy City health inspectors ignited the “elote wars” labor dispute by cracking down and dousing bleach on the tropical fruit salads and barbecued corn ears of unsuspecting food carts in a random effort to clamp down on illegal hawkers.

Street food vending can be risky business, and the relationship between the law and street food is a complicated one. The chart here won’t necessarily clarify what sort of legislation allows for maximum tastiness. Rather, it demonstrates that what’s strictly legal (or illegal) doesn’t dictate the reality on the streets. Like heat-resistant microorganisms growing in a sunless hydrothermal vent, street food can persist even in the most seemingly inhospitable environments.

Lara Rabinovitch is a historian and writer living in Los Angeles. She’s working on a book about pastrami and the people who brought it to North America.  

Illustrated and designed by Helen Tseng

Welcome to the United States of Good Sandwiches
What kind of sandwich are you having for lunch?
This is one of the most interesting online interactive campaigns we’ve seen that aims to protect our planet Earth. Check out how The Climate Reality Project is creatively engaging people to sign petitions on whatilove.org.
Posted by GOOD community member, Jeff Oeth in  Environment, Nature and Food

This is one of the most interesting online interactive campaigns we’ve seen that aims to protect our planet Earth. Check out how The Climate Reality Project is creatively engaging people to sign petitions on whatilove.org.

Posted by GOOD community member, Jeff Oeth in Environment, Nature and Food

9 Reasons to Celebrate Farmer’s Market Week- AmericanFarmland wrote in Health, Living and Food

"It’s local community coming together to support and nurture each other and the earth we live on."—Tomi from Homer, NY.
For every $10 spent on local food, as much as $7.80 is re-spent in the local community.
"There’s nothing better than interacting with the people that nourish your body."—L.V. of Ashtabula, OH.

Continue reading on good.is

9 Reasons to Celebrate Farmer’s Market Week
AmericanFarmland wrote in Health, Living and Food

  1. "It’s local community coming together to support and nurture each other and the earth we live on."—Tomi from Homer, NY.
  2. For every $10 spent on local food, as much as $7.80 is re-spent in the local community.
  3. "There’s nothing better than interacting with the people that nourish your body."—L.V. of Ashtabula, OH.

Continue reading on good.is

Infographic: The State of Organics- Emily Howard and Francesca Ramos contributed in Health, Living and Food
October 2012 marked the 10th anniversary of the USDA organic seal helping to raise awareness and provide consumers with more food options. As the organics industry grows it’s becoming more common to walk into a grocery store and see organic products in the produce sections and on shelves. But even though you’ve likely seen the USDA certified organic seal, how much do you know about the product behind the label?

Start taking ownership of your health with our DIY Health Check-up.

Infographic: The State of Organics
Emily Howard and Francesca Ramos contributed in Health, Living and Food

October 2012 marked the 10th anniversary of the USDA organic seal helping to raise awareness and provide consumers with more food options. As the organics industry grows it’s becoming more common to walk into a grocery store and see organic products in the produce sections and on shelves. But even though you’ve likely seen the USDA certified organic seal, how much do you know about the product behind the label?

Start taking ownership of your health with our DIY Health Check-up.

Creative Mornings: Masterpieces You Can Eat for Breakfast- Yasha Wallin wrote in Food, Art and Photography

Ida Skivenes likes to play with her food. And lucky for us, because the Oslo, Norway-based artist crafts the most stunning homages to modern art through a few simple ingredients and a lot of detail. For her “Art Toast Project,” she’s been remaking some of the world’s most famous works of art in a unique medium: jam, cheese, peanut butter, and other food stuffs using toast as her canvas.
In this ongoing project, with new work posted on her Instagram account regularly, she attempts to make art more accessible to the public, and perhaps play on the concept of “food porn” that so many Instagrammers flood their feeds with. The artist explains, “What inspired me initially was the literal meaning of ‘food art,’ in that one creates artworks with food. So I combined that with my personal interest in modern art and set out to see if it was possible to recreate famous painters masterpieces without dishonoring them completely. It’s a way of sharing my love of both food and art together.”

Continue reading on good.is

Creative Mornings: Masterpieces You Can Eat for Breakfast
Yasha Wallin wrote in Food, Art and Photography

Ida Skivenes likes to play with her food. And lucky for us, because the Oslo, Norway-based artist crafts the most stunning homages to modern art through a few simple ingredients and a lot of detail. For her “Art Toast Project,” she’s been remaking some of the world’s most famous works of art in a unique medium: jam, cheese, peanut butter, and other food stuffs using toast as her canvas.

In this ongoing project, with new work posted on her Instagram account regularly, she attempts to make art more accessible to the public, and perhaps play on the concept of “food porn” that so many Instagrammers flood their feeds with. The artist explains, “What inspired me initially was the literal meaning of ‘food art,’ in that one creates artworks with food. So I combined that with my personal interest in modern art and set out to see if it was possible to recreate famous painters masterpieces without dishonoring them completely. It’s a way of sharing my love of both food and art together.”

Continue reading on good.is


Why We’ve Turned our Apartment Into a Part-time Restaurant- Emily Coates wrote in Food, New York City and Brooklyn

For the past two years, on (almost) every fourth Saturday of the month, our apartment turns into a part-time restaurant. Sixteen to 20 people show up at our gate over by the Domino Sugar Factory, tucked under the Williamsburg Bridge, to eat with people they’ve never met. We call it Neighbor.
The first dinner was nerve wracking. We spent all week preparing. We went through the schedule over and over and over and over again. We worried about everything. Who would come? Will they think it’s weird? Will they like the food?

Continue reading on good.is

Why We’ve Turned our Apartment Into a Part-time Restaurant
Emily Coates wrote in Food, New York City and Brooklyn

For the past two years, on (almost) every fourth Saturday of the month, our apartment turns into a part-time restaurant. Sixteen to 20 people show up at our gate over by the Domino Sugar Factory, tucked under the Williamsburg Bridge, to eat with people they’ve never met. We call it Neighbor.

The first dinner was nerve wracking. We spent all week preparing. We went through the schedule over and over and over and over again. We worried about everything. Who would come? Will they think it’s weird? Will they like the food?

Continue reading on good.is


Citizenship Building Block #11: Learn to Cook a Dish With a Story- Lara Rabinovitch in Living, Food and Building Blocks Of Citizenship
Food is a window into culture. Learning to cook a dish from your heritage will make you a better global citizen by enriching your mind—and belly. So this month spend some time with a grandmother and learn how to cook a dish she knows well. This may be with your grandmother, someone else’s grandmother, or your grandfather—because he’s the cook of the family. Whether it’s Japanese rice balls, Brazilian feijoada, Ukrainian varenyky, or curry vindaloo, learn how to make at least one dish from one part of your heritage. It might be tuna casserole or tamales or thin-crust pizza. Either way: take notes, ask questions, and taste. You’ll learn how to make something to share with others while also reconnecting with a part of your past. Think of it as culinary archaeology, only tastier.
Add this to your To-Do List

Citizenship Building Block #11: Learn to Cook a Dish With a Story
Lara Rabinovitch in Living, Food and Building Blocks Of Citizenship

Food is a window into culture. Learning to cook a dish from your heritage will make you a better global citizen by enriching your mind—and belly. So this month spend some time with a grandmother and learn how to cook a dish she knows well. This may be with your grandmother, someone else’s grandmother, or your grandfather—because he’s the cook of the family. Whether it’s Japanese rice balls, Brazilian feijoada, Ukrainian varenyky, or curry vindaloo, learn how to make at least one dish from one part of your heritage. It might be tuna casserole or tamales or thin-crust pizza. Either way: take notes, ask questions, and taste. You’ll learn how to make something to share with others while also reconnecting with a part of your past. Think of it as culinary archaeology, only tastier.

Add this to your To-Do List