Posts tagged fashion

Our Friends At AbleMade Create Exclusive Products Made To Fund Social Impact Projects

Collaboration = power. We’re asking you to collaborate with us and help fund Able Made’s first 2014 collection in time for Valentines Day. Each piece in the line will fund a specific social impact project. Our beautifully designed, exclusive products are made by amazing designers and brands, and fund charitable projects around the globe. 100% of the proceeds from this fundraiser will be used to produce Able Made’s upcoming 2014 collection and help promote it through spring. Become an Able Made Producer and get amazing perks for contributing!

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GOOD Community member Suzanne McKenzie wrote in Giving Tuesday and Fashion

Socially Conscious Style Is on the Rise- Juana Colon posted in Design, Living and Fashion
The good news and bad news is that socially conscious fashion is no longer news. It’s undeniably wonderful that so many designers are paying closer attention to how, where, and by whom things are made.
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Socially Conscious Style Is on the Rise
Juana Colon posted in Design, Living and Fashion

The good news and bad news is that socially conscious fashion is no longer news. It’s undeniably wonderful that so many designers are paying closer attention to how, where, and by whom things are made.

Continue reading

Nothing Stops This Badass Blogger- Hannah Wasserman posted in Living, Creativity and Fashion

Awesome story about this fashion blogger who has spastic muscular dystrophy. She is uses a wheelchair but that hasn’t stopped her from entering the fashion industry just like any able person.
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Nothing Stops This Badass Blogger
Hannah Wasserman posted in Living, Creativity and Fashion

Awesome story about this fashion blogger who has spastic muscular dystrophy. She is uses a wheelchair but that hasn’t stopped her from entering the fashion industry just like any able person.

Continue to link

Join Vivienne Westwood’s Climate Revolution- Yasha Wallin posted in Creativity, Fashion and Living
"Buy less, choose well, make it last," urges legendary fashion designer Vivienne Westwood. Join her campaign to combat climate change by following simple steps for a climate revolution. Getting involved means taking individual and collective action; engaging in art and culture (Get off the consumer treadmill); cutting down on consumption; supporting an NGO; and signing up to receive updates from the campaign on more ways to be engaged in the future.

Join Vivienne Westwood’s Climate Revolution
Yasha Wallin posted in Creativity, Fashion and Living

"Buy less, choose well, make it last," urges legendary fashion designer Vivienne Westwood. Join her campaign to combat climate change by following simple steps for a climate revolution. Getting involved means taking individual and collective action; engaging in art and culture (Get off the consumer treadmill); cutting down on consumption; supporting an NGO; and signing up to receive updates from the campaign on more ways to be engaged in the future.

How the Fashion Industry is Rallying to Help Victims of Hurricane Sandy
Following immediate pledges to the American Red Cross, fashion continues its rapid response to hurricane Sandy with everyone from Ralph Lauren to United Bamboo giving back.
Thanks, Yasha

How the Fashion Industry is Rallying to Help Victims of Hurricane Sandy

Following immediate pledges to the American Red Cross, fashion continues its rapid response to hurricane Sandy with everyone from Ralph Lauren to United Bamboo giving back.

Thanks, Yasha

Polaroids Of The Tokyo Sky, Transformed Into Shimmering Hermès Scarves
Tokyo sunsets x polaroids x Hermès
Thanks, Kate
In our latest look at what’s ethical in fashion, lifestyle editor Amanda Hess talks about Vogue's recent policy on not showing models 16 and under any longer, and why that might not be quite good enough:

Condé Nast’s pledge fails to distinguish between the real work of a fashion shoot and the fantasy images that result from it. Which model “appears to have an eating disorder”? The one who must actually starve herself to fit into a sample size 0? Or the naturally thin one whose body type—replicated over and over and over again in Vogue's advertisements, runway coverage, and editorials—is nevertheless dangerous to the young women who will starve themselves to get as small as she is? Voguedoesn’t say.

Read more on GOOD→

In our latest look at what’s ethical in fashion, lifestyle editor Amanda Hess talks about Vogue's recent policy on not showing models 16 and under any longer, and why that might not be quite good enough:

Condé Nast’s pledge fails to distinguish between the real work of a fashion shoot and the fantasy images that result from it. Which model “appears to have an eating disorder”? The one who must actually starve herself to fit into a sample size 0? Or the naturally thin one whose body type—replicated over and over and over again in Vogue's advertisements, runway coverage, and editorials—is nevertheless dangerous to the young women who will starve themselves to get as small as she is? Voguedoesn’t say.

Read more on GOOD→

Ethical Style: How Ethical Is ‘Artisanal’ Production?
Like the watered-down ethical buzzwords “green” and “sustainable” and “organic” before it, the term “artisanal” no longer necessarily signifies hand-made, skilled craftsmanship. It means whatever a company says it does.That’s bad for conscious consumers, because truly artisanal products present several ethical upshots.
Read more on GOOD.is

Ethical Style: How Ethical Is ‘Artisanal’ Production?

Like the watered-down ethical buzzwords “green” and “sustainable” and “organic” before it, the term “artisanal” no longer necessarily signifies hand-made, skilled craftsmanship. It means whatever a company says it does.That’s bad for conscious consumers, because truly artisanal products present several ethical upshots.

Read more on GOOD.is

In the past few decades, the fashion cycle has accelerated, price tags have plummeted, and shoppers have adapted: We’ve learned to buy more clothes and value them less.
Spring cleaning may inspire you to load a bag full of old clothes to Goodwill, but what about cleaning up your cheap clothing habit instead?
Ethical Style: How to Kick Fast Fashion

In the past few decades, the fashion cycle has accelerated, price tags have plummeted, and shoppers have adapted: We’ve learned to buy more clothes and value them less.

Spring cleaning may inspire you to load a bag full of old clothes to Goodwill, but what about cleaning up your cheap clothing habit instead?

Ethical Style: How to Kick Fast Fashion

Subpar working conditions in garment factories around the world have long been the subject of stateside media attention, but conditions in American factories largely slip under the radar. In fact, most consumers spy a label like “Made in the USA” and assume the workers who made their T-shirt are paid and treated better than most. As the Wang suit shows, even an expensive garment—an Alexander Wang tee can cost upwards of $200—doesn’t guarantee better working conditions for its producers.
Just because your $200 t-shirt was made in America doesn’t mean it wasn’t made in a sweatshop.  

Subpar working conditions in garment factories around the world have long been the subject of stateside media attention, but conditions in American factories largely slip under the radar. In fact, most consumers spy a label like “Made in the USA” and assume the workers who made their T-shirt are paid and treated better than most. As the Wang suit shows, even an expensive garment—an Alexander Wang tee can cost upwards of $200—doesn’t guarantee better working conditions for its producers.

Just because your $200 t-shirt was made in America doesn’t mean it wasn’t made in a sweatshop.  

Ethical Style: Don’t Donate Clothes, Repurpose Them
Quality clothing means better fabric, and good fabric can be reworked again and again to make sure it never goes out of style. Today, we want an ever-changing array of cheap clothes, and we rarely think about sustainability or quality. In order to consume clothes more ethically, we must change the way we think about them.

Ethical fashion requires making new styles out of metaphorical rags (even if they’re just last season’s jeggings), whether from your closet, thrift stores, consignment shops, or online outlets.

Read more on GOOD→ 

Ethical Style: Don’t Donate Clothes, Repurpose Them

Quality clothing means better fabric, and good fabric can be reworked again and again to make sure it never goes out of style. Today, we want an ever-changing array of cheap clothes, and we rarely think about sustainability or quality. In order to consume clothes more ethically, we must change the way we think about them.

Ethical fashion requires making new styles out of metaphorical rags (even if they’re just last season’s jeggings), whether from your closet, thrift stores, consignment shops, or online outlets.

Read more on GOOD 

Ethical Style: Where Do My Used Clothes Go?
Today, we only hang on to about 21 percent of the clothing we buy every year. What happens to the pieces that don’t make the cut? Most of them end up in landfills—only about 15 percent of discarded clothing is recycled or reused, whether by individual or industry. Perhaps it’s time to start asking a new question: Why do we have so much junk that we are in the position to inundate the world with our reject piles? 
Read more on GOOD→ 

Ethical Style: Where Do My Used Clothes Go?

Today, we only hang on to about 21 percent of the clothing we buy every year. What happens to the pieces that don’t make the cut? Most of them end up in landfills—only about 15 percent of discarded clothing is recycled or reused, whether by individual or industry. Perhaps it’s time to start asking a new question: Why do we have so much junk that we are in the position to inundate the world with our reject piles? 

Read more on GOOD→ 

Ethical Style: Why Fashion Needs to Get Political
As the ethical fashion world has grown to tackle more problems and reach more markets—and socially conscious fashion becomes imperceptible from other clothing on the rack—the movement’s political underpinnings have decentralized. Discussion of ethical fashion has exploded in recent years, but without the clarity of a “Save the Whales” tee, we’re not totally sure what we’re aware of anymore. Fashion needs a rebirth of the political spirit—a serious consumer-focused movement to help us navigate the trends.
Read the story on GOOD→ 

Ethical Style: Why Fashion Needs to Get Political

As the ethical fashion world has grown to tackle more problems and reach more markets—and socially conscious fashion becomes imperceptible from other clothing on the rack—the movement’s political underpinnings have decentralized. Discussion of ethical fashion has exploded in recent years, but without the clarity of a “Save the Whales” tee, we’re not totally sure what we’re aware of anymore. Fashion needs a rebirth of the political spirit—a serious consumer-focused movement to help us navigate the trends.

Read the story on GOOD→ 

Can a Denim Kilt Fight Climate Change?
A futuristic collaboration between a nanotechnologist and fashion designer is raising the bar for environmentally friendly fashion with concept line Catalytic Clothing. Chemist Tony Ryan at the University of Sheffield in England and professor Helen Storey of London College of Fashion premiered their project last summer with installations of air-purifying textiles, including a “field of jeans” that used photocatalysts to fight air pollution.
Read about it on GOOD→ 

Can a Denim Kilt Fight Climate Change?

A futuristic collaboration between a nanotechnologist and fashion designer is raising the bar for environmentally friendly fashion with concept line Catalytic Clothing. Chemist Tony Ryan at the University of Sheffield in England and professor Helen Storey of London College of Fashion premiered their project last summer with installations of air-purifying textiles, including a “field of jeans” that used photocatalysts to fight air pollution.

Read about it on GOOD→ 

Ethical Style: How Is My T-Shirt Made?
Your T-shirt can be made any number of ways, but more likely than not, it isn’t made here. Ethical Style takes us through the T-shirt’s journey through the fashion supply chain. 
Curious about bamboo shirts? Check out the column on GOOD→ 

Ethical Style: How Is My T-Shirt Made?

Your T-shirt can be made any number of ways, but more likely than not, it isn’t made here. Ethical Style takes us through the T-shirt’s journey through the fashion supply chain. 

Curious about bamboo shirts? Check out the column on GOOD→