Posts tagged environment

"The delicate balances of nature, essential for our survival, can only be saved through a global effort involving all of us."
- John McConnell, Earth Day Prolamation, 1970

"The delicate balances of nature, essential for our survival, can only be saved through a global effort involving all of us."

- John McConnell, Earth Day Prolamation, 1970

Interactive Infographic: 11 Controversial Health Innovations (That We’re Still Talking About)

From pasteurization to deet, the world has seen many health innovations that have inarguably saved lives, reduced illness, and prevented severe outbreaks. Yet whether due to unforeseen consequences, changing moral or cultural attitudes, or environmental concerns, many of these innovations have become sources of controversy and debate today.
Back in September, we launched the GOOD Pioneers of Health Challenge in search of the most creative and innovative leaders in health work across the African continent. The response we got was amazing—and diverse. Health innovation continues to highlight radical people with radical solutions to major global issues. 
This is a short list of some of the issues we’ve found ourselves talking about with friends, family, and colleagues. We know there are dozens more that we could include. So tell us: What health innovations are you talking about?


GOOD Community members Jessica Rivera and Tyler Hoehne contributed in Health, Environment and Infographics

Interactive Infographic: 11 Controversial Health Innovations (That We’re Still Talking About)

From pasteurization to deet, the world has seen many health innovations that have inarguably saved lives, reduced illness, and prevented severe outbreaks. Yet whether due to unforeseen consequences, changing moral or cultural attitudes, or environmental concerns, many of these innovations have become sources of controversy and debate today.

Back in September, we launched the GOOD Pioneers of Health Challenge in search of the most creative and innovative leaders in health work across the African continent. The response we got was amazing—and diverse. Health innovation continues to highlight radical people with radical solutions to major global issues. 

This is a short list of some of the issues we’ve found ourselves talking about with friends, family, and colleagues. We know there are dozens more that we could include. So tell us: What health innovations are you talking about?

GOOD Community members Jessica Rivera and Tyler Hoehne contributed in Health, Environment and Infographics

This Disaster Housing Can Be Built in 5 Hours

A Dutch designer created this Lego-like emergency house, which is laser-cut on a CNC machine and then can snap together in as little as five hours. The house was made for Haiti, and includes a roof that can collect rainwater and filter it for clean drinking water.
Continue to popupcity.net

Shared by GOOD Community member Adele Peters in Design, Architecture and Environment

This Disaster Housing Can Be Built in 5 Hours

A Dutch designer created this Lego-like emergency house, which is laser-cut on a CNC machine and then can snap together in as little as five hours. The house was made for Haiti, and includes a roof that can collect rainwater and filter it for clean drinking water.

Continue to popupcity.net

Shared by GOOD Community member Adele Peters in Design, Architecture and Environment

How A Government Shutdown Impacts You

GOOD member MakinSense Babe shares in Politics, Health and Environment.

makinsensebabe:

How a shutdown impacts your life……
Don’t worry, the U.S. military will continue to operate.

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The Department of education will get sent home but your friends who are teachers still have to go to work. 

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Hundreds of national parks will close.

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Air traffic control stays open. 

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U.S. Postal Service stays open.

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And the DMV closes (maybe). 

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Missed why the government shut down? Click here —-> Here’s a quick explainer

There’s no age requirement for activists - meet Xiuhtezcatl Roske-Martinez

If my memories of what I was like at 13 aren’t too clouded by time and nostalgia, permit me to say that I think I was a pretty switched-on kid. Yet at the same time I never translated those feelings into any sort of action. Maybe I didn’t know how, maybe I just didn’t believe that I could - I can’t really remember now. All of this has been on my mind since earlier this week I met Xiuhtezcatl - a 13 year old activist whose been fighting environmental issues since he was 6.

Continue to voicesofyouth.org

Shared by GOOD Community member Kate Pawelczyk in Climate Change, Environment and Activism

There’s no age requirement for activists - meet Xiuhtezcatl Roske-Martinez

If my memories of what I was like at 13 aren’t too clouded by time and nostalgia, permit me to say that I think I was a pretty switched-on kid. Yet at the same time I never translated those feelings into any sort of action. Maybe I didn’t know how, maybe I just didn’t believe that I could - I can’t really remember now. All of this has been on my mind since earlier this week I met Xiuhtezcatl - a 13 year old activist whose been fighting environmental issues since he was 6.

Continue to voicesofyouth.org

Shared by GOOD Community member Kate Pawelczyk in Climate Change, Environment and Activism

This is one of the most interesting online interactive campaigns we’ve seen that aims to protect our planet Earth. Check out how The Climate Reality Project is creatively engaging people to sign petitions on whatilove.org.
Posted by GOOD community member, Jeff Oeth in  Environment, Nature and Food

This is one of the most interesting online interactive campaigns we’ve seen that aims to protect our planet Earth. Check out how The Climate Reality Project is creatively engaging people to sign petitions on whatilove.org.

Posted by GOOD community member, Jeff Oeth in Environment, Nature and Food

A Community Effort to Be the First Climate-Resilient Block in Baltimore- Jonathan Erwin wrote in Environment, Climate Change and Social Design

Ten years ago, the 2400 block of Jefferson Street was one of the deadliest in East Baltimore. Today, thanks to enormous efforts from neighbors, community groups, and local nonprofits, this block has become a positive model of grassroots urban renewal. Street and violent crimes have stabilized, drug markets have either shut down or moved elsewhere, and residents have taken back their block and a sense of community with it. But for these neighbors, improving the safety of their community isn’t enough, so the 2400 block of Jefferson Street is evolving again.
This time, this East Baltimore block is working to become the first climate resilient block in Baltimore.

Continue reading on good.is

A Community Effort to Be the First Climate-Resilient Block in Baltimore
Jonathan Erwin wrote in Environment, Climate Change and Social Design

Ten years ago, the 2400 block of Jefferson Street was one of the deadliest in East Baltimore. Today, thanks to enormous efforts from neighbors, community groups, and local nonprofits, this block has become a positive model of grassroots urban renewal. Street and violent crimes have stabilized, drug markets have either shut down or moved elsewhere, and residents have taken back their block and a sense of community with it. But for these neighbors, improving the safety of their community isn’t enough, so the 2400 block of Jefferson Street is evolving again.

This time, this East Baltimore block is working to become the first climate resilient block in Baltimore.

Continue reading on good.is


Redesigning Recess: Why Kids Need Natural Playgrounds- Sara Gilliam wrote in Environment, Education and Nature


Two preschoolers live in a city. Los Angeles, perhaps, or Houston. Both attend full-time preschool. Both are learning to write their names and developing social skills through peer interactions. Both profess enduring love for Daniel Tiger and the color yellow. On paper, these two children emerge from similar circumstances and have similar educational experiences and opportunities. Except for one distinction.

Continue reading on good.is

Redesigning Recess: Why Kids Need Natural Playgrounds
Sara Gilliam wrote in Environment, Education and Nature

Two preschoolers live in a city. Los Angeles, perhaps, or Houston. Both attend full-time preschool. Both are learning to write their names and developing social skills through peer interactions. Both profess enduring love for Daniel Tiger and the color yellow. On paper, these two children emerge from similar circumstances and have similar educational experiences and opportunities. Except for one distinction.

Continue reading on good.is

Why Cities Must Allow Us to Love and Leave our Cars- Jeff Speck wrote in Health, Environment and Living

I love cars. As a teenager, I had twin subscriptions to Car & Driver and Road & Track. My chief school-bus skill was the ability to name the make and model of every vehicle that passed. Until recently, I have always owned the best-handling car I could reasonably afford. I especially love high-revving Japanese sports cars like the one I drove from Miami to Washington, D.C. when I moved here in 2003. I remember the trip lasting about six hours, assisted by a tailwind and a top-of-the-line radar detector.
But an interesting thing happened when I arrived in Washington. I found myself driving less and less, and paying more and more per mile. Aside from trips to Home Depot and the occasional country jaunt, I had no reason to break my car out of its garage. Between walking, biking, and our extensive Metro transit system, driving was rarely the most convenient choice. And the parking lot beneath my apartment building charged a small fortune in fees. Add to that the availability of ZipCar car-sharing in my neighborhood, and it soon became apparent that going car-free was the most convenient option.

Continue reading on good.is

Why Cities Must Allow Us to Love and Leave our Cars
Jeff Speck wrote in Health, Environment and Living

I love cars. As a teenager, I had twin subscriptions to Car & Driver and Road & Track. My chief school-bus skill was the ability to name the make and model of every vehicle that passed. Until recently, I have always owned the best-handling car I could reasonably afford. I especially love high-revving Japanese sports cars like the one I drove from Miami to Washington, D.C. when I moved here in 2003. I remember the trip lasting about six hours, assisted by a tailwind and a top-of-the-line radar detector.

But an interesting thing happened when I arrived in Washington. I found myself driving less and less, and paying more and more per mile. Aside from trips to Home Depot and the occasional country jaunt, I had no reason to break my car out of its garage. Between walking, biking, and our extensive Metro transit system, driving was rarely the most convenient choice. And the parking lot beneath my apartment building charged a small fortune in fees. Add to that the availability of ZipCar car-sharing in my neighborhood, and it soon became apparent that going car-free was the most convenient option.

Continue reading on good.is

Peru Will Give Free Solar Power to 2 Million Poorest Citizens- Adele Peters wrote in Solar Power, Global Citizenship and Environment
Peruvians who don’t have access to the power grid today will soon be getting their own free home solar panels, thanks to the national government. A new program will start by giving solar power to 500,000 of the lowest-income households in the country. By 2016, 95 percent of Peru should have electricity and all of the benefits that come with it, from saving money, to more chances to study, to better health and safety.
Continue to inhabitat.com

Peru Will Give Free Solar Power to 2 Million Poorest Citizens
Adele Peters wrote in Solar Power, Global Citizenship and Environment

Peruvians who don’t have access to the power grid today will soon be getting their own free home solar panels, thanks to the national government. A new program will start by giving solar power to 500,000 of the lowest-income households in the country. By 2016, 95 percent of Peru should have electricity and all of the benefits that come with it, from saving money, to more chances to study, to better health and safety.

Continue to inhabitat.com

This is what happens when you give a creative community an empty 14,000-square-foot building- Fixing TheFuture wrote in Greenliving, Environment and Community


Everything in the space is donated or foraged: the couches, the desks, the refrigerator, everything inside the refrigerator (much of that has been donated by the Facebook Causes office).

Continue to fastcoexisit.com

This is what happens when you give a creative community an empty 14,000-square-foot building
Fixing TheFuture wrote in Greenliving, Environment and Community

Everything in the space is donated or foraged: the couches, the desks, the refrigerator, everything inside the refrigerator (much of that has been donated by the Facebook Causes office).

Continue to fastcoexisit.com

UPDATE: GOOD Ideas: Is Space the Next Frontier?- Hillary Newman wrote in Environment, Space and Exploration
[UPDATE: Check out the complete hangout in the video below]

Welcome to GOOD Ideas, a web series where we talk with people who are doing cool things to make the world a better place. We’ll be updating this post with a live stream of the conversation via Google Hangout, so remember to bookmark this link. We hope you’ll tune in, ask questions in the comment field below, and help us push the conversation forward.
In the Friday, June 28 episode starting at 11:30 AM PST, journalist Maxwell Williams explores our fascination with space and its feasibility as the next frontier. Williams will be joined by Buckminster Fuller Institute president David McConville and Chris Lewicki, president and chief engineer of Planetary Resources.
Carrying on the conversation raised in GOOD Magazine’s Exploration Issue (Summer 2013), our guests will contemplate how, as mankind continues to ravage the planet, we find ourselves increasingly casting our gaze upwards in search of a solution—and, if need be, an escape. Take a look at some of this summer’s movie blockbusters: Elysium, After Earth, Oblivion. Outer space and what that vast expanse may or may not contain has become a recurring theme not only in pop culture, but among artists, social innovators, entrepreneurs, and futurists alike. Could space be the answer we’re looking for? 
Continue reading on good.is
Want more? Subscribe to GOOD Magazine.

UPDATE: GOOD Ideas: Is Space the Next Frontier?
Hillary Newman wrote in EnvironmentSpace and Exploration


[UPDATE: Check out the complete hangout in the video below]


Welcome to
GOOD Ideas, a web series where we talk with people who are doing cool things to make the world a better place. We’ll be updating this post with a live stream of the conversation via Google Hangout, so remember to bookmark this link. We hope you’ll tune in, ask questions in the comment field below, and help us push the conversation forward.

In the Friday, June 28 episode starting at 11:30 AM PST, journalist Maxwell Williams explores our fascination with space and its feasibility as the next frontier. Williams will be joined by Buckminster Fuller Institute president David McConville and Chris Lewicki, president and chief engineer of Planetary Resources.

Carrying on the conversation raised in GOOD Magazine’s Exploration Issue (Summer 2013), our guests will contemplate how, as mankind continues to ravage the planet, we find ourselves increasingly casting our gaze upwards in search of a solution—and, if need be, an escape. Take a look at some of this summer’s movie blockbusters: Elysium, After Earth, Oblivion. Outer space and what that vast expanse may or may not contain has become a recurring theme not only in pop culture, but among artists, social innovators, entrepreneurs, and futurists alike. Could space be the answer we’re looking for? 

Continue reading on good.is

Want more? Subscribe to GOOD Magazine.

Let’s Preserve The Most Biodiverse Floral Kingdom on Earth- Evan Eifler wrote in Push For Good, Environment and Science


By area, the Cape Floristic Province of South Africa is the most biodiverse floristic kingdom on the planet. To give you an idea, there are 30 percent more plant species in the Cape Floristic Province than in the entire United States, yet the area it covers is less than that of Alaska. An amazing 69 percent of that biodiversity occurs nowhere else on earth. Only four to six percent of the renosterveld vegetation type remains, and it is in danger of being lost forever to modern agricultural technology and indifferent, uninformed land use decisions. In fact, all regional varieties of the renosterveld are now listed as “critically endangered” by the South African government.

Floral kingdoms across the world

Continue reading on good.is

Let’s Preserve The Most Biodiverse Floral Kingdom on Earth
Evan Eifler wrote in Push For Good, Environment and Science

By area, the Cape Floristic Province of South Africa is the most biodiverse floristic kingdom on the planet. To give you an idea, there are 30 percent more plant species in the Cape Floristic Province than in the entire United States, yet the area it covers is less than that of Alaska. An amazing 69 percent of that biodiversity occurs nowhere else on earth. Only four to six percent of the renosterveld vegetation type remains, and it is in danger of being lost forever to modern agricultural technology and indifferent, uninformed land use decisions. In fact, all regional varieties of the renosterveld are now listed as “critically endangered” by the South African government.

Floral kingdoms across the world

Continue reading on good.is

ParkScore: The Top 10 City Park Systems in the U.S.- Adele Peters wrote in Environment, Nature and Cities

Parks change us: people who live near parks are not just more likely to exercise and meet their neighbors, but also less stressed, anxious, or depressed; kids with ADD do better on tests after spending time in parks; and being in nature can even make us more creative. Parks can also reduce crime, and they help fight climate change. Most of this research is fairly new, so it’s not that surprising that cities haven’t always valued parks and open space, and in the United States, there’s a huge variation in how public park systems are designed in different cities, and how they’re supported.
Continue reading on good.is

ParkScore: The Top 10 City Park Systems in the U.S.
Adele Peters wrote in Environment, Nature and Cities

Parks change us: people who live near parks are not just more likely to exercise and meet their neighbors, but also less stressed, anxious, or depressed; kids with ADD do better on tests after spending time in parks; and being in nature can even make us more creative. Parks can also reduce crime, and they help fight climate change. Most of this research is fairly new, so it’s not that surprising that cities haven’t always valued parks and open space, and in the United States, there’s a huge variation in how public park systems are designed in different cities, and how they’re supported.

Continue reading on good.is

#forthelove of the GOOD Outdoors- GOOD HQ wrote in Environment, Exploration and News

This month on GOOD.is, we are focusing on the topic of exploration—embracing the spirit of discovery and exploring areas near and far. We will be posting on the subject all month at good.is/exploration and encourage you to tag your own posts “exploration.” 
For our monthly challenge: Join our community effort to discover, share, and protect the places we love. Take this opportunity to expand your horizons and embark on an adventure, whether it’s venturing to a new place that’s close to home or trekking across the planet—no matter what hemisphere you’re in. You know that moment when you pull out your phone and snap a photo because you can’t believe how awesome the view is and you want to share it with everyone you know?

Continue reading on good.is
Illustration by Corinna Loo

#forthelove of the GOOD Outdoors
GOOD HQ wrote in Environment, Exploration and News

This month on GOOD.is, we are focusing on the topic of exploration—embracing the spirit of discovery and exploring areas near and far. We will be posting on the subject all month at good.is/exploration and encourage you to tag your own posts “exploration.” 

For our monthly challenge: Join our community effort to discover, share, and protect the places we love. Take this opportunity to expand your horizons and embark on an adventure, whether it’s venturing to a new place that’s close to home or trekking across the planet—no matter what hemisphere you’re in. You know that moment when you pull out your phone and snap a photo because you can’t believe how awesome the view is and you want to share it with everyone you know?

Continue reading on good.is

Illustration by Corinna Loo