Posts tagged election 2012

A Liberal’s Letter to Conservatives: Why Democrats Need You More Than Ever

Dear Conservatives,

Wow. Well that sucked, didn’t it?

I know how you’re feeling, and I don’t mean that in a condescending, mock-sympathy, shoulder-rub way. I really do. On a brisk November night in 2004 I lit a candle at my college’s chapel and despaired precisely the way you are now. I remember all too well that pit of dread in my stomach and the disbelieving heat flushing my cheeks. I get it, I really do, and I’m sorry about that. Kind of.

Now it’s the days after. All us liberals are walking around with huge grins, holding doors for people, and being all cheery and spry. Even our hangovers taste sweet. 

Despite all this, the election produced some very good news for you. 

What is it? That the Republican Party—in its current form—is dead. Its heart monitor is screaming  “BEEEEEEEE” in flatline and no matter how hard you pound on its chest you’re not bringing it back to life. Step back from the gurney, wipe the sweat from your brow, look at your watch and call it: time of death, 1:50 p.m., November 6, 2012. Why is this good news? 

Yesterday’s Republican Party had become diseased with anachronistic, extremist, jingoistic, and xenophobic ideology. It was infected by the Tea Party, the religious right, and the Koch Brothers. The Party was no longer the moderate, dignified, intellectual conservatism of yore, championed by well-educated members of the middle class. It had mutated into the party of people who protest outside post offices with handwritten protest signs declaring Obama a Muslim “socalist” and that English should be our official “langauguage.” In short, your Grand Old Party poisoned its grand old self. 

Do not mourn its passing though. The death of yesterday’s Republican Party was necessary to ensure tomorrow’s Republican Party is a viable political movement for the future. That movement must embody fiscal—not social—conservatism, small egalitarian government, and responsible free markets. Lastly and most importantly, base your political ideology on solid data, statistics, and reason, NOT fear, jingoism, and bigotry.

Look to sane conservatives—the Log Cabin Republicans, the Megan McCains, the John Hunstmans, even the Chris Christies. Approach political discourse like adults, not petulant children. Leave religion and your Bible totally and completely out of it—as per your favorite document, the U.S. Constitution.

The right-wing blogs are aflutter—this country is doomed, they say. America just died. In a sense, they’re right. The country they wanted, their ideal America, the country of backwards social policies where gay weddings will ruin your marriage and weed is bad mkay and women can’t look after their own bodies and anybody with dark skin is probably stealing shit be it TVs or jobs—that bizarre notion of America is dead.  

What these people don’t get, and what they’ll never get, is that America’s laws and politics should always reflect the desires of the majority of its populace, and the majority of its populace isn’t interested in their version of America.

These people will never adapt to the changing times. They will prop up the party’s corpse and scream louder, spittle flying as they rage about the death of our Constitution, the sanctity of marriage, of God’s rape-given gifts. They will insist “Obama Hussein’s” reelection means WAR, dammit, REVOLUTION. When this happens—and it already is—here’s what you do:

Tell them to Fuck. Right. Off.

Why am I telling you this? Why tip my liberal hand and give you advice? Because we—the Democrats—we need you.

I know, that sounds weird. The liberals reading this just choked on their soy lattes. But I’m serious. We need a reasonable counterpoint, an opposing view, a dissenting opinion. When you challenge our ideas with sound argument it will force us to make them stronger. The arguments of yesterday’s Republican Party were not sound, and the electorate knew it. Democrats didn’t so much win this election as the GOP lost it.

If you want to stick to your old ideology, we liberals take great pleasure in thumping you again. If you don’t think we can, remember you’ve lost the popular vote five out of the last six elections, and your demographic is only getting worse.

So please. Realize that yesterday’s Republican Party sucked. Light its funeral pyre and say a few words as it burns. Then from its ashes, rebuild it to the respectable party it once was.   

Much love, if you can believe it,

Your (liberal) fellow American

- Thanks, Wylie Overstreet

Taken Aback by Take Back Tuesday - by David Mizner
In the summer, when Josh Neuman and I were talking about the effort that would become Take Back Tuesday, he said he thought business owners would be willing to close up shop for Election Day, to help employees vote and otherwise celebrate democracy. I was skeptical.
We know now that Josh was right. In 21 states and Washington D.C., 69 businesses participated in the DIY holiday. They signed on perhaps because it was, as Anthony DiMarco at Neiman in Philadelphia says, a “simple and great idea,” but certainly because they wanted to restore our democracy. The democracy that, in the words of Made Movement’s Alex Bogusky, "has made our business possible in the first place.”
The first 50 to sign on, like Sports Science in Fairfax, Virginia, received a limited edition poster, but it was apparently possible to Take Back Tuesday even without this gem. Judging by reports on Twitter, people loved celebrating Election Day.
Please see the inspiring photos here, here, here, here & here.
Take Back Tuesday encouraged not just businesses, but also individuals to turn Election Day into a holiday. Many of you came up with great ideas, like Allen Salkin’s Bonfire of the Inanities: “At noon on Election Day everyone burns everything campaign related they have been mailed, handed, or forced to read in the newspaper.”
Josh urged me to take an honest measure of the campaign. So I’ll point out that we had a slight messaging problem. Some, like this Atlantic writer, likened our effort to past calls to make Election Day a national holiday, not realizing we were asking people to create their own holiday.
Nonetheless, this effort was a big success. I enjoyed participating and, more generally, I loved interacting with the GOOD community.
I come out of blog world, which lends itself to rants, and I can rant with the best of them. But my anger derives from idealism, and my idealism has found a cozy home here at GOOD, where people focus not just on problems but also on solutions. So, thanks.
We’ve elected a president, but the monumental job of strengthening our democracy continues. Onward…
Illustration by Tyler Hoehne

Taken Aback by Take Back Tuesday - by David Mizner

In the summer, when Josh Neuman and I were talking about the effort that would become Take Back Tuesday, he said he thought business owners would be willing to close up shop for Election Day, to help employees vote and otherwise celebrate democracy. I was skeptical.

We know now that Josh was right. In 21 states and Washington D.C., 69 businesses participated in the DIY holiday. They signed on perhaps because it was, as Anthony DiMarco at Neiman in Philadelphia says, a “simple and great idea,” but certainly because they wanted to restore our democracy. The democracy that, in the words of Made Movement’s Alex Bogusky, "has made our business possible in the first place.”

The first 50 to sign on, like Sports Science in Fairfax, Virginia, received a limited edition poster, but it was apparently possible to Take Back Tuesday even without this gem. Judging by reports on Twitter, people loved celebrating Election Day.

Please see the inspiring photos here, here, here, here & here.

Take Back Tuesday encouraged not just businesses, but also individuals to turn Election Day into a holiday. Many of you came up with great ideas, like Allen Salkin’s Bonfire of the Inanities: “At noon on Election Day everyone burns everything campaign related they have been mailed, handed, or forced to read in the newspaper.”

Josh urged me to take an honest measure of the campaign. So I’ll point out that we had a slight messaging problem. Some, like this Atlantic writer, likened our effort to past calls to make Election Day a national holiday, not realizing we were asking people to create their own holiday.

Nonetheless, this effort was a big success. I enjoyed participating and, more generally, I loved interacting with the GOOD community.

I come out of blog world, which lends itself to rants, and I can rant with the best of them. But my anger derives from idealism, and my idealism has found a cozy home here at GOOD, where people focus not just on problems but also on solutions. So, thanks.

We’ve elected a president, but the monumental job of strengthening our democracy continues. Onward…

Illustration by Tyler Hoehne

Intermission: Tammy Baldwin Becomes First Openly Gay U.S. Senator to Deafening Applause

Last night, Tammy Baldwin became the first female senator from Wisconsin and the first openly gay senator in the history of United States.

Thank you, Wisconsin.

Thanks, Pete

Today at GOOD we’re voting and making Election Day a holiday.
How are you celebrating?
#TakeBackTuesday

Today at GOOD we’re voting and making Election Day a holiday.

How are you celebrating?

#TakeBackTuesday

http://takebacktuesday.good.is
Poster design by Tyler Hoehne

http://takebacktuesday.good.is

Poster design by Tyler Hoehne

Tonight we party, tomorrow we vote!
Who and What the F***Are We Voting For!? — A Party
Photo by Tyler Hoehne

Tonight we party, tomorrow we vote!

Who and What the F***Are We Voting For!? — A Party

Photo by Tyler Hoehne

For Those of Us Who Have Kids: Tuesday Is Bring Your Children to the Voting Booth Day - by David Mizner
I’ve been writing a lot about the need to create an American culture of voting. That’s what exists in places with high turnout, and that’s what the Take Back Tuesday campaign aims to help create.
Culture is passed down from one generation to the next, so this election season I’m planning to take my two older sons (Baby Izzy can wait till 2014) to the polling station (which, I should point out, is located in the lobby of my apartment building). 
Not just to the polling station but into the booth. Wait—is that legal? Yeah, you can show your kids what goes on behind the curtain as long as they’re younger than 18. The process, with the machine and booth, is likely to captivate young children, and older ones—well, they probably won’t mind it. It’s a chance, in any case, to start a tradition that they may someday pass down.
Ideally, Election Day would be a national holiday, a civic celebration, and a trip to the polls with family and friends would be just one among several communal, festive activities. Till then, and to that end, create your own celebratory customs, bring your children to the polls, Take Back Tuesday.
This post is part of the Take Back Tuesday campaign to make Voting Day a national holiday. Sign up or encourage your company to join in at takebacktuesday.good.is.
Illustration by Tyler Hoehne

For Those of Us Who Have Kids: Tuesday Is Bring Your Children to the Voting Booth Day - by David Mizner

I’ve been writing a lot about the need to create an American culture of voting. That’s what exists in places with high turnout, and that’s what the Take Back Tuesday campaign aims to help create.

Culture is passed down from one generation to the next, so this election season I’m planning to take my two older sons (Baby Izzy can wait till 2014) to the polling station (which, I should point out, is located in the lobby of my apartment building). 

Not just to the polling station but into the booth. Wait—is that legal? Yeah, you can show your kids what goes on behind the curtain as long as they’re younger than 18. The process, with the machine and booth, is likely to captivate young children, and older ones—well, they probably won’t mind it. It’s a chance, in any case, to start a tradition that they may someday pass down.

Ideally, Election Day would be a national holiday, a civic celebration, and a trip to the polls with family and friends would be just one among several communal, festive activities. Till then, and to that end, create your own celebratory customs, bring your children to the polls, Take Back Tuesday.

This post is part of the Take Back Tuesday campaign to make Voting Day a national holiday. Sign up or encourage your company to join in at takebacktuesday.good.is.

Illustration by Tyler Hoehne

Know Your Ballot: How to Vote on Your 2012 Propositions
A helpful tool to review both sides of every 2012 proposition—from all 50 states—that needs your vote.
You can even print out your preferences and take it with you to the polls!
Brought to you by GOOD HQ

Know Your Ballot: How to Vote on Your 2012 Propositions

A helpful tool to review both sides of every 2012 proposition—from all 50 states—that needs your vote.

You can even print out your preferences and take it with you to the polls!

Brought to you by GOOD HQ

Frank Zappa Was Getting Out the Vote Before it Was Cool - by Jeff Newelt

Frank Zappa (RIP) was the iconoclast’s iconoclast, a genius composer/guitarist, an exacto-sharp satirist and a prominent promoter of voter registration years before “Rock The Vote” or MTV’s “Choose or Lose” began. He included “Register to Vote” on every album since 1971 when 18-year-olds won the right to vote, and was the first to register voters in concert halls, with the help of the League of Women Voters.
“Nothing scares them more than the possibility they will be voted out. The ballot box is still quite a weapon if we can just get people to use it, that’s all,” Zappa told my 19-year-old self in 1991, at the close of an interview I conducted for 34th Street Magazine at UPENN.
Continue reading on good.is
Illustration by Fatim Hana

Frank Zappa Was Getting Out the Vote Before it Was Cool - by Jeff Newelt

Frank Zappa (RIP) was the iconoclast’s iconoclast, a genius composer/guitarist, an exacto-sharp satirist and a prominent promoter of voter registration years before “Rock The Vote” or MTV’s “Choose or Lose” began. He included “Register to Vote” on every album since 1971 when 18-year-olds won the right to vote, and was the first to register voters in concert halls, with the help of the League of Women Voters.

“Nothing scares them more than the possibility they will be voted out. The ballot box is still quite a weapon if we can just get people to use it, that’s all,” Zappa told my 19-year-old self in 1991, at the close of an interview I conducted for 34th Street Magazine at UPENN.

Continue reading on good.is

Illustration by Fatim Hana

Designing a Phenomenon: Student Designs Inspire a New Approach to Voting - by Matt Luckhurst

Our class “Designing a Phenomenon,” taught by Brian Collins and me, is an intensive fourth-year honors class at the School of Visual Arts in New York City. It is solely focused on a designers’ ability to influence and change behavior. 
Inspired by the GOOD community’s Take Back Tuesday challenge, we asked our students to create a new phenomenon around the act of voting. The election of the president should be cause for a celebration around the most important act every American can do: get out and vote. Every four years we debate the reasons for the deep interest in the election on one hand, but the apathy people exhibit around voting on the other.
Continue reading on good.is

Featured design by student HeeSang Lee: For election day “We’re Closed”

Designing a Phenomenon: Student Designs Inspire a New Approach to Voting - by Matt Luckhurst

Our class “Designing a Phenomenon,” taught by Brian Collins and me, is an intensive fourth-year honors class at the School of Visual Arts in New York City. It is solely focused on a designers’ ability to influence and change behavior. 

Inspired by the GOOD community’s Take Back Tuesday challenge, we asked our students to create a new phenomenon around the act of voting. The election of the president should be cause for a celebration around the most important act every American can do: get out and vote. Every four years we debate the reasons for the deep interest in the election on one hand, but the apathy people exhibit around voting on the other.

Continue reading on good.is

Featured design by student HeeSang Lee: For election day “We’re Closed”

GOOD Video: No More Pricetags on Our Presidents

This video is brought to you by GOOD, with the support of Ben & Jerry’s

Did you know that the 2012 presidential campaigns have been the most expensive in the history of the world? Thanks to the Citizens United ruling in 2010, corporations have been allowed to use unlimited money resources to fund and influence initiatives that aren’t always in the best interest of citizens. Huge political funding gives an unfair share of political clout to the haves, and not enough for the have-nots. And when it comes to the presidential election, neither candidate can afford to fall behind the other in financing when the stakes are so high.

The result? Regardless of who wins the 2012 election, the day our president takes office he’s going to owe a lot of favors to corporate special interests. And that isn’t right. 

Last time we checked, America was a nation founded by and for the people, not political corporate interests. To take the price tags off our politicians, we need to take a stand against the Citizens United ruling. By coming together, we can take back our voices and get the dough out of politics. 

Learn more about Citizens United at our videos exploring the issue (click above and here) and then go here to take action.

Who and What the F***Are We Voting For!? — A Party - by Casey Caplowe
Even if you’re not one of the potentially mythical undecided voters in the presidential race, you may still be one of the roughly 100 percent of people (we made that up, but it feels right) who are undecided on the various ballot measures and state and local races you’ll find in front of you on November 6.
To help solve this problem and cram for the big event coming up just around the corner, we’re proposing a Who and What the F—- Are We Voting For!? party. 
The idea is simple: 
Find a spot to have a party. Invite some friends. Assign each guest one of the non-presidential races or ballot measures and ask them to prepare a short presentation (two minutes) to be delivered to everyone else at the party. During the party, as people present (questions and consulting the internet is fine) everyone fills out the DIY Voter Guide we’re providing below to bring to the polling booth as a cheat sheet. And we figured some drinking doesn’t hurt, so we’ve got a simple drinking game you can follow along with too. 
If you’re into it: 
Click here to download a toolkit and to-do list to help you make it happen. 
Click here to download the DIY Voter Guide and Drinking Game (print one copy for each attendee).
Click here to see if there’s any of these events happening near you, or add your own to the list on GOOD’s Meetup Everywhere page. 
And we suggest grabbing the image from the top of this post to use in your invite email to friends. (To download it, just right-click (or control-click if you’re on a Mac) the image and save it to your computer.)
And as you get more into it, here are some resources to figure out what’s on the ballot near you:
For full listings of what’s on the ballot in your zipcode: theballot.org or pollvault.com 
For the GOOD Community’s reviews on Ballot measures - vote.good.is
Many local newspapers have good voter guides and even endorsements published. We suggest searching for those perspectives to help you along your way. 
Cheers! America is lucky to have citizens like you.
This post is part of the Take Back Tuesday campaign to make Voting Day a national holiday. Sign up or encourage your company to join in at takebacktuesday.good.is.

Who and What the F***Are We Voting For!? — A Party - by Casey Caplowe

Even if you’re not one of the potentially mythical undecided voters in the presidential race, you may still be one of the roughly 100 percent of people (we made that up, but it feels right) who are undecided on the various ballot measures and state and local races you’ll find in front of you on November 6.

To help solve this problem and cram for the big event coming up just around the corner, we’re proposing a Who and What the F—- Are We Voting For!? party. 

The idea is simple: 

Find a spot to have a party. Invite some friends. Assign each guest one of the non-presidential races or ballot measures and ask them to prepare a short presentation (two minutes) to be delivered to everyone else at the party. During the party, as people present (questions and consulting the internet is fine) everyone fills out the DIY Voter Guide we’re providing below to bring to the polling booth as a cheat sheet. And we figured some drinking doesn’t hurt, so we’ve got a simple drinking game you can follow along with too. 

If you’re into it: 

  • Click here to download a toolkit and to-do list to help you make it happen. 
  • Click here to download the DIY Voter Guide and Drinking Game (print one copy for each attendee).
  • Click here to see if there’s any of these events happening near you, or add your own to the list on GOOD’s Meetup Everywhere page
  • And we suggest grabbing the image from the top of this post to use in your invite email to friends. (To download it, just right-click (or control-click if you’re on a Mac) the image and save it to your computer.)

And as you get more into it, here are some resources to figure out what’s on the ballot near you:

  • For full listings of what’s on the ballot in your zipcode: theballot.org or pollvault.com 
  • For the GOOD Community’s reviews on Ballot measures - vote.good.is
  • Many local newspapers have good voter guides and even endorsements published. We suggest searching for those perspectives to help you along your way. 

Cheers! America is lucky to have citizens like you.

This post is part of the Take Back Tuesday campaign to make Voting Day a national holiday. Sign up or encourage your company to join in at takebacktuesday.good.is.

Lena Dunham on her first time

Thanks, Hill

Election Day Eats: Introducing ‘Voting Day’ Apple Pie Bake-Offs - by Lara Rabinovitch

Ask your friends to name their favorite aspect of any holiday and talk will turn to food pretty quickly. So if Election Day were a national holiday, what food would we eat?
Nothing is as American as, well, apple pie, so I propose we mark Election Day by celebrating this quintessential American dish, broadly conceived, in voter-based baking competitions across the country. Think of it was voting with your ballot and palate.
Continue reading on good.is

Art Direction and Photography by Jessica De JesusApple pie by Carolyn Sams 

Election Day Eats: Introducing ‘Voting Day’ Apple Pie Bake-Offs - by Lara Rabinovitch

Ask your friends to name their favorite aspect of any holiday and talk will turn to food pretty quickly. So if Election Day were a national holiday, what food would we eat?

Nothing is as American as, well, apple pie, so I propose we mark Election Day by celebrating this quintessential American dish, broadly conceived, in voter-based baking competitions across the country. Think of it was voting with your ballot and palate.

Continue reading on good.is

Art Direction and Photography by Jessica De Jesus
Apple pie by Carolyn Sams 

30 days. 30 designers. 30 reasons.
In another year when the direction of this country seems so fragile, we are hoping that we can contribute with design in some measure. We all have the ability to speak up, to stand up, to impact the course of this country.
Thanks, Oliver

30 days. 30 designers. 30 reasons.

In another year when the direction of this country seems so fragile, we are hoping that we can contribute with design in some measure. We all have the ability to speak up, to stand up, to impact the course of this country.

Thanks, Oliver