Posts tagged design

Transparency: Paying the Same Amount for Smaller Products
Many of the everyday items you buy have been suspiciously shrinking, without a reduce in cost! 

Transparency: Paying the Same Amount for Smaller Products

Many of the everyday items you buy have been suspiciously shrinking, without a reduce in cost! 

Super fun meeting at the brand new @goodeggsla hq yesterday. These guys are taking over a section of an old Hostess factory to run their operation delivering amazing locally produced foods. Gotta love that kind of transition. #fromtwinkiestofreshlyjuicedalmondmilk

Super fun meeting at the brand new @goodeggsla hq yesterday. These guys are taking over a section of an old Hostess factory to run their operation delivering amazing locally produced foods. Gotta love that kind of transition. #fromtwinkiestofreshlyjuicedalmondmilk

Some fun type and lettering from one of our favorite illustrators and good members, Matt Chase.
Check out his profile on good.is

Some fun type and lettering from one of our favorite illustrators and good members, Matt Chase.

Check out his profile on good.is

‘WarkaWater’ is a 9 m tall structure (30 foot) bamboo framework. Inside the hanging fabric and spanned in tension inside capable to collect potable water from the air by condensation. The lightweight structure is designed with parametric computing, but can be built with local skills and materials by the village inhabitants without the aid of special machinery.
Continue reading on good.is
Posted by GOOD Community member Murtaza Baker.

‘WarkaWater’ is a 9 m tall structure (30 foot) bamboo framework. Inside the hanging fabric and spanned in tension inside capable to collect potable water from the air by condensation. The lightweight structure is designed with parametric computing, but can be built with local skills and materials by the village inhabitants without the aid of special machinery.

Continue reading on good.is

Posted by GOOD Community member Murtaza Baker.

Imagine if your doctor could personalize your care. IBM researchers predicts that in five years, doctors will routinely use your DNA to keep you well. Cancer could then be treated on a DNA level in both the patient and tumor, at a scale and speed never before possible. Check out the video here.
Illustration and animation by Brent Clouse

Imagine if your doctor could personalize your care. IBM researchers predicts that in five years, doctors will routinely use your DNA to keep you well. Cancer could then be treated on a DNA level in both the patient and tumor, at a scale and speed never before possible. Check out the video here.

Illustration and animation by Brent Clouse

It is common knowledge that every person has an optimal way of learning. By analyzing a range of data sets that include curricula, student attendance records, and students’ behavior on e-learning platforms, IBM aims to turn big data into usable information for education systems on all levels. Want to see how syllabus can turn into syllabi? Check out the video here.
Illustration and animation by Brent Clouse

It is common knowledge that every person has an optimal way of learning. By analyzing a range of data sets that include curricula, student attendance records, and students’ behavior on e-learning platforms, IBM aims to turn big data into usable information for education systems on all levels. Want to see how syllabus can turn into syllabi? Check out the video here.

Illustration and animation by Brent Clouse

Why Designers Need to Share What We Do


Designers: in order to show non-designers the real value we can contribute, advocate for our profession in a rapidly developing and changing world, and help build a better world in which more people are creative problem solvers…
We have to articulate our profession in non-design terminology.

We have to be able to teach our profession to others.

Continue reading on good.is

Written by GOOD Community member Annie Wu in Business, Creativity and Social Design

Why Designers Need to Share What We Do

Designers: in order to show non-designers the real value we can contribute, advocate for our profession in a rapidly developing and changing world, and help build a better world in which more people are creative problem solvers…

  • We have to articulate our profession in non-design terminology.
  • We have to be able to teach our profession to others.

Continue reading on good.is

Written by GOOD Community member Annie Wu in BusinessCreativity and Social Design

This Disaster Housing Can Be Built in 5 Hours

A Dutch designer created this Lego-like emergency house, which is laser-cut on a CNC machine and then can snap together in as little as five hours. The house was made for Haiti, and includes a roof that can collect rainwater and filter it for clean drinking water.
Continue to popupcity.net

Shared by GOOD Community member Adele Peters in Design, Architecture and Environment

This Disaster Housing Can Be Built in 5 Hours

A Dutch designer created this Lego-like emergency house, which is laser-cut on a CNC machine and then can snap together in as little as five hours. The house was made for Haiti, and includes a roof that can collect rainwater and filter it for clean drinking water.

Continue to popupcity.net

Shared by GOOD Community member Adele Peters in Design, Architecture and Environment

Let’s Fix It: Fall 2013, GOOD Magazine’s (Re)design Issue- Joshua Neuman wrote in Design, Good Magazine and Subscribe

The (Re)design Issue tells a DIO (do-it-ourselves) design story that not only chronicles the ways in which design thinking is being deployed all over the world, but also calls you, the GOOD community, to take part in its deployment. 
That DIO story is a thread that winds itself throughout the issue. It runs through Chelsea Roff’s story about how you can redesign your well-being; it runs through our roundtable with GOOD’s first-ever Global Exchange Fellows who are redesigning the way we think about neighborhoods; you hear it in Ralph Nader’s recollections of the doomed Chevy Corvair on its 50th anniversary; you see it in Bethlehem Shoals’ essay on the championship legacy of the NBA coaching collaboration of Phil Jackson and Tex Winter, who effectively redesigned teamwork; and we hope you will take part in it as you explore our 14-page feature on half-baked solutions. 

For the designers among you, we expect you’ll notice the (Re)design Issue pushing against the boundaries of what constitutes a “design problem.” Our hope is that all of you begin thinking a little bit more like designers. We think our planet needs it.

Subscribe to GOOD Magazine here!

Let’s Fix It: Fall 2013, GOOD Magazine’s (Re)design Issue
Joshua Neuman wrote in Design, Good Magazine and Subscribe

The (Re)design Issue tells a DIO (do-it-ourselves) design story that not only chronicles the ways in which design thinking is being deployed all over the world, but also calls you, the GOOD community, to take part in its deployment. 

That DIO story is a thread that winds itself throughout the issue. It runs through Chelsea Roff’s story about how you can redesign your well-being; it runs through our roundtable with GOOD’s first-ever Global Exchange Fellows who are redesigning the way we think about neighborhoods; you hear it in Ralph Nader’s recollections of the doomed Chevy Corvair on its 50th anniversary; you see it in Bethlehem Shoals’ essay on the championship legacy of the NBA coaching collaboration of Phil Jackson and Tex Winter, who effectively redesigned teamwork; and we hope you will take part in it as you explore our 14-page feature on half-baked solutions. 

For the designers among you, we expect you’ll notice the (Re)design Issue pushing against the boundaries of what constitutes a “design problem.” Our hope is that all of you begin thinking a little bit more like designers. We think our planet needs it.

Subscribe to GOOD Magazine here!

This is one of the most interesting online interactive campaigns we’ve seen that aims to protect our planet Earth. Check out how The Climate Reality Project is creatively engaging people to sign petitions on whatilove.org.
Posted by GOOD community member, Jeff Oeth in  Environment, Nature and Food

This is one of the most interesting online interactive campaigns we’ve seen that aims to protect our planet Earth. Check out how The Climate Reality Project is creatively engaging people to sign petitions on whatilove.org.

Posted by GOOD community member, Jeff Oeth in Environment, Nature and Food

Play: Print Out and Play This GOOD-Designed Crossword Puzzle About Our Favorite Childhood Games- Hillary Newman posted in Play, Design and Games
When work gets busy, our errands list looks never ending, and our calendar fill up, it’s easy to forget to make time for fun. In the spirt of play and well-being, click through and print out this crossword puzzle PDF about the best games from our youth. And while you’re here, share your favorite games in the comments below!
Download PDF here
Illustration by Francesca Ramos

Play: Print Out and Play This GOOD-Designed Crossword Puzzle About Our Favorite Childhood Games
Hillary Newman posted in Play, Design and Games

When work gets busy, our errands list looks never ending, and our calendar fill up, it’s easy to forget to make time for fun. In the spirt of play and well-being, click through and print out this crossword puzzle PDF about the best games from our youth. And while you’re here, share your favorite games in the comments below!

Download PDF here

Illustration by Francesca Ramos

How Teenage Girls With Power Tools Transformed a Neighborhood- Alex Gilliam wrote in Design, Cities and Chicago

It was a scorchingly hot Tuesday afternoon last summer on a rough corner in South Chicago. Despite the heat, and despite it being the time of day when people normally start rolling in to buy drugs and alcohol, things were a little different that day. Jania, a 17-year-old from the community, pictured above, was smiling, and others around her were, too.
It was the second day in our design-build program, where a group of local teenage girls were working to transform a vacant lot in their neighborhood. Jania was smiling because she had just used power tools for the first time, and just built something—a work bench—for the first time. But she was also smiling because she was seeing her community start to transform due to her actions.

Continue reading on good.is

How Teenage Girls With Power Tools Transformed a Neighborhood
Alex Gilliam wrote in Design, Cities and Chicago

It was a scorchingly hot Tuesday afternoon last summer on a rough corner in South Chicago. Despite the heat, and despite it being the time of day when people normally start rolling in to buy drugs and alcohol, things were a little different that day. Jania, a 17-year-old from the community, pictured above, was smiling, and others around her were, too.

It was the second day in our design-build program, where a group of local teenage girls were working to transform a vacant lot in their neighborhood. Jania was smiling because she had just used power tools for the first time, and just built something—a work bench—for the first time. But she was also smiling because she was seeing her community start to transform due to her actions.

Continue reading on good.is

The City Social: Why Urbanism Needs To Return To Observation- Patrick McDonnell wrote in Design, Livng and Cities


I have to admit that, as a planner, there are times that I get whisked away by the elegance of drawings and the process of making them, and there are times that I feel like designers are the leaders of the free world who can grant wishes because of the way we’re able to articulate ideas on paper. But drawings, models, briefs, etc. are just artifacts—they don’t tell us shit about the complexity of human behavior. They don’t inform us about the extremely social nature of cities and what the vibe is like on the ground. About a year ago, I left my desk job at City Hall to pursue a life of observation. I wanted to see urban planning from the field, get in the mix, and leave the paper version of the city behind. I wanted to get to know Dallas by becoming a part of it, get to know my neighbors and how to use the city as a tool—that’s urbanism. Now, I work as a freelance urbanist. I’m in the city, seeing what I can see, and then finding solutions to fix the problems.

Continue reading on good.is

The City Social: Why Urbanism Needs To Return To Observation
Patrick McDonnell wrote in Design, Livng and Cities

I have to admit that, as a planner, there are times that I get whisked away by the elegance of drawings and the process of making them, and there are times that I feel like designers are the leaders of the free world who can grant wishes because of the way we’re able to articulate ideas on paper. But drawings, models, briefs, etc. are just artifacts—they don’t tell us shit about the complexity of human behavior. They don’t inform us about the extremely social nature of cities and what the vibe is like on the ground.

About a year ago, I left my desk job at City Hall to pursue a life of observation. I wanted to see urban planning from the field, get in the mix, and leave the paper version of the city behind. I wanted to get to know Dallas by becoming a part of it, get to know my neighbors and how to use the city as a tool—that’s urbanism. Now, I work as a freelance urbanist. I’m in the city, seeing what I can see, and then finding solutions to fix the problems.

Continue reading on good.is

Why Designers Should Be Running Startups- Tim Hoover and Jessica Karle Heltzel contributed in Design, Business and Entrepreneurship

After leading design-thinking exercises with startups in the portfolios of Facebook Fund and 500 Startups, I realized that strong design leadership at the founding-team level is critical to an integrated and sustained culture of design. You can host design workshops, office hours and consult, which are all helpful, but often startups revert back to their existing habits, and design becomes an add on, like putting lipstick on a pig. Who is going to lead, model and inspire design behaviors in everyone at a company? Who is going to truly champion the user-experience with the authority to make decisions?

Continue reading on good.is
This is an excerpt from Kern and Burn: Conversations With Design Entrepreneurs, a book that features candid conversations with 30 leading designers who have founded startups, channeled personal passions into self-made careers and taken risks to do what they love. Here, Jessica Heltzel and Tim Hoover talk with Enrique Allen, who founded the Designer Fund to help designers launch new startups.

Why Designers Should Be Running Startups
Tim Hoover and Jessica Karle Heltzel contributed in Design, Business and Entrepreneurship

After leading design-thinking exercises with startups in the portfolios of Facebook Fund and 500 Startups, I realized that strong design leadership at the founding-team level is critical to an integrated and sustained culture of design. You can host design workshops, office hours and consult, which are all helpful, but often startups revert back to their existing habits, and design becomes an add on, like putting lipstick on a pig. Who is going to lead, model and inspire design behaviors in everyone at a company? Who is going to truly champion the user-experience with the authority to make decisions?

Continue reading on good.is

This is an excerpt from Kern and Burn: Conversations With Design Entrepreneurs, a book that features candid conversations with 30 leading designers who have founded startups, channeled personal passions into self-made careers and taken risks to do what they love. Here, Jessica Heltzel and Tim Hoover talk with Enrique Allen, who founded the Designer Fund to help designers launch new startups.

This Norwegian Valley Town Built an Artificial Sun To Brighten the Darkness- Mary Slosson posted in Global Citizenship, Design and Creativity

Rjukan is a small Norwegian town of roughly 3,300 residents nestled in a valley in northern Norway. Because of its unique geographic location, the town is cloaked in darkness for five months every year.
But not for much longer! A new project is installing mirrors on a mountaintop that overlooks the city and will shine a artificial sunlight into the town. Exposure to sunlight helps ward off depression and sadness, so the town of Rjukan just might be a little more cheerful this winter.

Continue to gizmodo.com

This Norwegian Valley Town Built an Artificial Sun To Brighten the Darkness
Mary Slosson posted in Global Citizenship, Design and Creativity

Rjukan is a small Norwegian town of roughly 3,300 residents nestled in a valley in northern Norway. Because of its unique geographic location, the town is cloaked in darkness for five months every year.

But not for much longer! A new project is installing mirrors on a mountaintop that overlooks the city and will shine a artificial sunlight into the town. Exposure to sunlight helps ward off depression and sadness, so the town of Rjukan just might be a little more cheerful this winter.

Continue to gizmodo.com