Posts tagged cities

Cities don’t always respond effectively to the needs of their communities. Frequently, those needs get encumbered by red tape. As a result, technology is evolving to create more fluid communication between the people and the polity, and IBM is betting that it won’t be long before you’ll notice it. By 2017, there’s expected to be more than three billion smart phones in the world, opening up cities to people like never before. Check out the video here. 
Illustration and animation by Brent Clouse.

Cities don’t always respond effectively to the needs of their communities. Frequently, those needs get encumbered by red tape. As a result, technology is evolving to create more fluid communication between the people and the polity, and IBM is betting that it won’t be long before you’ll notice it. By 2017, there’s expected to be more than three billion smart phones in the world, opening up cities to people like never before. Check out the video here. 

Illustration and animation by Brent Clouse.

David Byrne On Creativity, the 1%, and What Makes a Great City

Really great insights by David Byrne here, who laments the current state of New York City. “The city is a body and a mind—a physical structure as well as a repository of ideas and information. Knowledge and creativity are resources. If the physical (and financial) parts are functional, then the flow of ideas, creativity and information are facilitated. The city is a fountain that never stops: it generates its energy from the human interactions that take place in it….” Worth reading the rest.
Continue to creativetimereports.org

Shared by GOOD Community member, Stef McDonald in Cities, Economy and Urban Living.

David Byrne On Creativity, the 1%, and What Makes a Great City

Really great insights by David Byrne here, who laments the current state of New York City. “The city is a body and a mind—a physical structure as well as a repository of ideas and information. Knowledge and creativity are resources. If the physical (and financial) parts are functional, then the flow of ideas, creativity and information are facilitated. The city is a fountain that never stops: it generates its energy from the human interactions that take place in it….” Worth reading the rest.

Continue to creativetimereports.org

Shared by GOOD Community memberStef McDonald in CitiesEconomy and Urban Living.

This is one of the most interesting online interactive campaigns we’ve seen that aims to protect our planet Earth. Check out how The Climate Reality Project is creatively engaging people to sign petitions on whatilove.org.
Posted by GOOD community member, Jeff Oeth in  Environment, Nature and Food

This is one of the most interesting online interactive campaigns we’ve seen that aims to protect our planet Earth. Check out how The Climate Reality Project is creatively engaging people to sign petitions on whatilove.org.

Posted by GOOD community member, Jeff Oeth in Environment, Nature and Food

How a Simple Postcard Can Build Community- Hunter Franks wrote in Storytelling, Cities and Neighboring

Sitting in their house in San Francisco’s Mission District, Elissa Chandler and Johanna Kenrick didn’t know what to think of a seemingly random postcard from someone named La Shon Walker that read, “My favorite place in Bayview is Candlestick Point because it’s a lovely park with amazing views.” Elissa and Johanna were curious and followed the printed URL on the back of the postcard. They soon realized their address was randomly selected to receive a postcard as part of the SF Postcard Project.
The SF Postcard Project fosters community connection through storytelling exchange. Residents in marginalized neighborhoods fill out a postcard with a positive personal story of their community. That postcard is then mailed to a random San Francisco resident to give them a different view of a neighborhood.

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How a Simple Postcard Can Build Community
Hunter Franks wrote in Storytelling, Cities and Neighboring

Sitting in their house in San Francisco’s Mission District, Elissa Chandler and Johanna Kenrick didn’t know what to think of a seemingly random postcard from someone named La Shon Walker that read, “My favorite place in Bayview is Candlestick Point because it’s a lovely park with amazing views.” Elissa and Johanna were curious and followed the printed URL on the back of the postcard. They soon realized their address was randomly selected to receive a postcard as part of the SF Postcard Project.

The SF Postcard Project fosters community connection through storytelling exchange. Residents in marginalized neighborhoods fill out a postcard with a positive personal story of their community. That postcard is then mailed to a random San Francisco resident to give them a different view of a neighborhood.

Continue reading on good.is

How Teenage Girls With Power Tools Transformed a Neighborhood- Alex Gilliam wrote in Design, Cities and Chicago

It was a scorchingly hot Tuesday afternoon last summer on a rough corner in South Chicago. Despite the heat, and despite it being the time of day when people normally start rolling in to buy drugs and alcohol, things were a little different that day. Jania, a 17-year-old from the community, pictured above, was smiling, and others around her were, too.
It was the second day in our design-build program, where a group of local teenage girls were working to transform a vacant lot in their neighborhood. Jania was smiling because she had just used power tools for the first time, and just built something—a work bench—for the first time. But she was also smiling because she was seeing her community start to transform due to her actions.

Continue reading on good.is

How Teenage Girls With Power Tools Transformed a Neighborhood
Alex Gilliam wrote in Design, Cities and Chicago

It was a scorchingly hot Tuesday afternoon last summer on a rough corner in South Chicago. Despite the heat, and despite it being the time of day when people normally start rolling in to buy drugs and alcohol, things were a little different that day. Jania, a 17-year-old from the community, pictured above, was smiling, and others around her were, too.

It was the second day in our design-build program, where a group of local teenage girls were working to transform a vacant lot in their neighborhood. Jania was smiling because she had just used power tools for the first time, and just built something—a work bench—for the first time. But she was also smiling because she was seeing her community start to transform due to her actions.

Continue reading on good.is

The City Social: Why Urbanism Needs To Return To Observation- Patrick McDonnell wrote in Design, Livng and Cities


I have to admit that, as a planner, there are times that I get whisked away by the elegance of drawings and the process of making them, and there are times that I feel like designers are the leaders of the free world who can grant wishes because of the way we’re able to articulate ideas on paper. But drawings, models, briefs, etc. are just artifacts—they don’t tell us shit about the complexity of human behavior. They don’t inform us about the extremely social nature of cities and what the vibe is like on the ground. About a year ago, I left my desk job at City Hall to pursue a life of observation. I wanted to see urban planning from the field, get in the mix, and leave the paper version of the city behind. I wanted to get to know Dallas by becoming a part of it, get to know my neighbors and how to use the city as a tool—that’s urbanism. Now, I work as a freelance urbanist. I’m in the city, seeing what I can see, and then finding solutions to fix the problems.

Continue reading on good.is

The City Social: Why Urbanism Needs To Return To Observation
Patrick McDonnell wrote in Design, Livng and Cities

I have to admit that, as a planner, there are times that I get whisked away by the elegance of drawings and the process of making them, and there are times that I feel like designers are the leaders of the free world who can grant wishes because of the way we’re able to articulate ideas on paper. But drawings, models, briefs, etc. are just artifacts—they don’t tell us shit about the complexity of human behavior. They don’t inform us about the extremely social nature of cities and what the vibe is like on the ground.

About a year ago, I left my desk job at City Hall to pursue a life of observation. I wanted to see urban planning from the field, get in the mix, and leave the paper version of the city behind. I wanted to get to know Dallas by becoming a part of it, get to know my neighbors and how to use the city as a tool—that’s urbanism. Now, I work as a freelance urbanist. I’m in the city, seeing what I can see, and then finding solutions to fix the problems.

Continue reading on good.is

ParkScore: The Top 10 City Park Systems in the U.S.- Adele Peters wrote in Environment, Nature and Cities

Parks change us: people who live near parks are not just more likely to exercise and meet their neighbors, but also less stressed, anxious, or depressed; kids with ADD do better on tests after spending time in parks; and being in nature can even make us more creative. Parks can also reduce crime, and they help fight climate change. Most of this research is fairly new, so it’s not that surprising that cities haven’t always valued parks and open space, and in the United States, there’s a huge variation in how public park systems are designed in different cities, and how they’re supported.
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ParkScore: The Top 10 City Park Systems in the U.S.
Adele Peters wrote in Environment, Nature and Cities

Parks change us: people who live near parks are not just more likely to exercise and meet their neighbors, but also less stressed, anxious, or depressed; kids with ADD do better on tests after spending time in parks; and being in nature can even make us more creative. Parks can also reduce crime, and they help fight climate change. Most of this research is fairly new, so it’s not that surprising that cities haven’t always valued parks and open space, and in the United States, there’s a huge variation in how public park systems are designed in different cities, and how they’re supported.

Continue reading on good.is

These IBM ads double as benches & shelter from the rain- Shauna Nep shared in Cities, Design and Smart Cities
IBM believes that city planning and design should have the citizens in mind. IBM’s “People For Smarter Cities” ads double as benches, ramps and shelter from the rain. The project aims to encourage ‘smarter thinking’ when it comes to coming up with solutions for the city. The ads also encourage people to share their ideas on how they can improve their neighborhood.
Continue to psfk.com

These IBM ads double as benches & shelter from the rain
Shauna Nep shared in Cities, Design and Smart Cities

IBM believes that city planning and design should have the citizens in mind. IBM’s “People For Smarter Cities” ads double as benches, ramps and shelter from the rain. The project aims to encourage ‘smarter thinking’ when it comes to coming up with solutions for the city. The ads also encourage people to share their ideas on how they can improve their neighborhood.

Continue to psfk.com

A Big Hello From GOOD Dallas- GOOD HQ wrote in Local, Cities and Dallas
Dallas, TX. It’s the biggest little city that could—with the most amazing little-known facts, like having the largest arts district in the country, a park we built out of thin air, a neighborhood with the world’s largest collection of art deco architecture, art and sculpture, and a giant river that we physically moved more than eight decades back that’s now on its way to being an unrivaled urban oasis.
It’s a city with a giant creative culture—where nothing is impossible. Dallas is a metropolis of big ideas with small town hearts. It’s where optimism and opportunity meet. Where steady industry, boundless creativity and effective philanthropy come together to build on the work of the city’s past do-gooders and the initiative and moxie of present good-doers—to engage each other in events and activities designed to fuel a new renaissance of positive change in Dallas. Join us in the excitement of moving Dallas forward even further.
Stay updated on all the good going on in Dallas by following the Dallas hub and joining the GOOD Dallas mailing list.
Continue reading on good.is to meet the team

A Big Hello From GOOD Dallas
GOOD HQ wrote in Local, Cities and Dallas

Dallas, TX. It’s the biggest little city that could—with the most amazing little-known facts, like having the largest arts district in the country, a park we built out of thin air, a neighborhood with the world’s largest collection of art deco architecture, art and sculpture, and a giant river that we physically moved more than eight decades back that’s now on its way to being an unrivaled urban oasis.

It’s a city with a giant creative culture—where nothing is impossible. Dallas is a metropolis of big ideas with small town hearts. It’s where optimism and opportunity meet. Where steady industry, boundless creativity and effective philanthropy come together to build on the work of the city’s past do-gooders and the initiative and moxie of present good-doers—to engage each other in events and activities designed to fuel a new renaissance of positive change in Dallas. Join us in the excitement of moving Dallas forward even further.

Stay updated on all the good going on in Dallas by following the Dallas hub and joining the GOOD Dallas mailing list.

Continue reading on good.is to meet the team

Citizenship Building Block #18: Try Biking to Work- Zachary Slobig wrote in Transportation, Cities and Living
Commuting sucks. ‘Mega commuters’ endure 90 minutes each way to punch the clock. More Americans fall into that category than there are residents of Copenhagen. Why point to that Danish city? It’s got the busiest biking street in the Western world—the result of years of public pressure and infrastructure investment that reshaped commuting habits. The arguments for bike commuting are familiar: healthier for you and the environment; saves you tons of cash; often faster than driving or taking public transit. Here’s another: it’s an opportunity to see your city or town without looking through a pane of shatter-proof glass. Another: it’s a lot of fun. In many places it can seem too dangerous to bike to work—no bike lanes and a gauntlet of taxi doors and four-wheeled aggression. A suggestion to mitigate those concerns: find at least one bike buddy. There’s strength (and safety) in numbers. So go ahead and try it. This week, saddle up and ride a bike to work. It might become a habit.
Continue to good.is

Citizenship Building Block #18: Try Biking to Work
Zachary Slobig wrote in Transportation, Cities and Living

Commuting sucks. ‘Mega commuters’ endure 90 minutes each way to punch the clock. More Americans fall into that category than there are residents of Copenhagen. Why point to that Danish city? It’s got the busiest biking street in the Western world—the result of years of public pressure and infrastructure investment that reshaped commuting habits. The arguments for bike commuting are familiar: healthier for you and the environment; saves you tons of cash; often faster than driving or taking public transit. Here’s another: it’s an opportunity to see your city or town without looking through a pane of shatter-proof glass. Another: it’s a lot of fun. In many places it can seem too dangerous to bike to work—no bike lanes and a gauntlet of taxi doors and four-wheeled aggression. A suggestion to mitigate those concerns: find at least one bike buddy. There’s strength (and safety) in numbers. So go ahead and try it. This week, saddle up and ride a bike to work. It might become a habit.

Continue to good.is

Turns Out Bike Lanes Are Really Good for Local Business- Meghan Neal wrote in Business, Transportation and Cities
Good news for bike activists: Making a safe place on streets for cyclists (and pedestrians) boosts sales for the small businesses in the area.
This according to a recent report from the New York Department of Transportation. The study found that on commercial blocks where new bike lanes were built, the businesses saw a nearly 50 percent increase in sales.
Continue reading on good.is
Join us for our Fix Your Street Challenge on the last Saturday of May. Click here to say you’ll Do It and be sure to share stories of transportation innovation all month.

Turns Out Bike Lanes Are Really Good for Local Business
Meghan Neal wrote in Business, Transportation and Cities

Good news for bike activists: Making a safe place on streets for cyclists (and pedestrians) boosts sales for the small businesses in the area.

This according to a recent report from the New York Department of Transportation. The study found that on commercial blocks where new bike lanes were built, the businesses saw a nearly 50 percent increase in sales.

Continue reading on good.is

Join us for our Fix Your Street Challenge on the last Saturday of May. Click here to say you’ll Do It and be sure to share stories of transportation innovation all month.

These Four Big Ideas Are the Cornerstones of Good Neighboring
Diana Lempel wrote in Cities, Neighborhoods and Social Capital

Recently, we here at Neighborday HQ have been asking ourselves: What are the ingredients of good neighboring? We think it comes down to four big ideas: social capital, neighborhood characters, third places, and sacred landscapes. You might notice these ideas sneaking into many of the Neighborday articles you read this month. Here’s a lowdown of those big ideas and the neighboring rockstars who developed them.

  • BIG IDEA #1: Neighborhood social networks are more than just the sum of their parts.
  • BIG IDEA #2: Neighborhoods have places where locals get together, and “everyone knows your name.
  • BIG IDEA #3: Neighborhoods have “public characters,” whose eyes on the street are the most keen and the most constant.  
  • BIG IDEA #4: Neighborhoods have stories, secrets and memories.

Continue reading on good.is

Illustrations by Corinna Loo


Why Good Fences Make Bad Neighbors: Annie Leonard’s Backyard Commune- Annie Leonard wrote in Living, Cities and Communal Living

When we were younger we all lived together in a big house in Washington, D.C. One couple moved out west for grad school at UC Berkeley, and over the next two decades, as other houses on the block became available, we all migrated. We tore down the fences in our back yards to have one huge shared garden; because so many in the community are avid gardeners (I’m not), I like to say that I live in a Monet painting with my best friends. 
We share Stuff all the time. We only need one barbecue, one table saw, one lawn mower, one fax and scanner. Because we share so much, we buy and consume and throw away less Stuff. Sure, we save money and conserve resources, but the real benefits are not material. 

Continue reading on good.is

Why Good Fences Make Bad Neighbors: Annie Leonard’s Backyard Commune
Annie Leonard wrote in Living, Cities and Communal Living

When we were younger we all lived together in a big house in Washington, D.C. One couple moved out west for grad school at UC Berkeley, and over the next two decades, as other houses on the block became available, we all migrated. We tore down the fences in our back yards to have one huge shared garden; because so many in the community are avid gardeners (I’m not), I like to say that I live in a Monet painting with my best friends. 

We share Stuff all the time. We only need one barbecue, one table saw, one lawn mower, one fax and scanner. Because we share so much, we buy and consume and throw away less Stuff. Sure, we save money and conserve resources, but the real benefits are not material. 

Continue reading on good.is

Playborhoods: Why Children Playing Street Games Is the Best Measure of a Healthy Neighborhood- Mike Lanza wrote in Education, Living and Cities
Many decades ago, neighborhoods were bustling with life. They were also bustling with children playing in groups, with no adults supervising them. Today, most neighborhoods are dead boring, and it’s difficult, if not impossible, to find children playing in them.
All this is no mere coincidence. Children have always been the most prominent people in neighborhoods. In fact, in many ways, children have always acted as the catalysts for neighborhood life. In my childhood neighborhood in the Pittsburgh suburbs back in the 1960s and 70s, my activities with friends were constantly pulling my parents and my friends’ parents together. They’d call each other to discuss one kid eating or sleeping at another’s house, and then they’d end up chatting about other things.
Continue reading on good.is

Playborhoods: Why Children Playing Street Games Is the Best Measure of a Healthy Neighborhood
Mike Lanza wrote in Education, Living and Cities

Many decades ago, neighborhoods were bustling with life. They were also bustling with children playing in groups, with no adults supervising them. Today, most neighborhoods are dead boring, and it’s difficult, if not impossible, to find children playing in them.

All this is no mere coincidence. Children have always been the most prominent people in neighborhoods. In fact, in many ways, children have always acted as the catalysts for neighborhood life. In my childhood neighborhood in the Pittsburgh suburbs back in the 1960s and 70s, my activities with friends were constantly pulling my parents and my friends’ parents together. They’d call each other to discuss one kid eating or sleeping at another’s house, and then they’d end up chatting about other things.

Continue reading on good.is


The Home Team: In an Age of Virtual Niches, In Praise of Opening Doors to Unfamiliar Neighbors- Frank Chimero wrote in Living, Creativity and Cities

I’ve never had a door that wasn’t next to someone else’s. Growing up, my bedroom was nearest to my sister’s; after that, I left home for college and dorm life, then greeted adulthood with successive apartments in the city. Chicago, Portland, then Brooklyn—with each move, I gained more neighbors on each side. 

Continue reading on good.is

The Home Team: In an Age of Virtual Niches, In Praise of Opening Doors to Unfamiliar Neighbors
Frank Chimero wrote in Living, Creativity and Cities

I’ve never had a door that wasn’t next to someone else’s. Growing up, my bedroom was nearest to my sister’s; after that, I left home for college and dorm life, then greeted adulthood with successive apartments in the city. Chicago, Portland, then Brooklyn—with each move, I gained more neighbors on each side. 

Continue reading on good.is