Posts tagged Technology

Cities don’t always respond effectively to the needs of their communities. Frequently, those needs get encumbered by red tape. As a result, technology is evolving to create more fluid communication between the people and the polity, and IBM is betting that it won’t be long before you’ll notice it. By 2017, there’s expected to be more than three billion smart phones in the world, opening up cities to people like never before. Check out the video here. 
Illustration and animation by Brent Clouse.

Cities don’t always respond effectively to the needs of their communities. Frequently, those needs get encumbered by red tape. As a result, technology is evolving to create more fluid communication between the people and the polity, and IBM is betting that it won’t be long before you’ll notice it. By 2017, there’s expected to be more than three billion smart phones in the world, opening up cities to people like never before. Check out the video here. 

Illustration and animation by Brent Clouse.

‘WarkaWater’ is a 9 m tall structure (30 foot) bamboo framework. Inside the hanging fabric and spanned in tension inside capable to collect potable water from the air by condensation. The lightweight structure is designed with parametric computing, but can be built with local skills and materials by the village inhabitants without the aid of special machinery.
Continue reading on good.is
Posted by GOOD Community member Murtaza Baker.

‘WarkaWater’ is a 9 m tall structure (30 foot) bamboo framework. Inside the hanging fabric and spanned in tension inside capable to collect potable water from the air by condensation. The lightweight structure is designed with parametric computing, but can be built with local skills and materials by the village inhabitants without the aid of special machinery.

Continue reading on good.is

Posted by GOOD Community member Murtaza Baker.

Your behavior is packed with data that can be utilized to maximize your digital security. IBM researchers are looking at the unique behaviors of individuals to develop the next generation of privacy and protection. They predict that in five years, a “digital guardian” will protect you online. As a result, security will no longer be dependent on vulnerable modes of protection like passwords, but will be automatic and made stronger through us just being us. Check out the video here.
Illustration and animation by Brent Clouse.

Your behavior is packed with data that can be utilized to maximize your digital security. IBM researchers are looking at the unique behaviors of individuals to develop the next generation of privacy and protection. They predict that in five years, a “digital guardian” will protect you online. As a result, security will no longer be dependent on vulnerable modes of protection like passwords, but will be automatic and made stronger through us just being us. Check out the video here.

Illustration and animation by Brent Clouse.

Imagine if your doctor could personalize your care. IBM researchers predicts that in five years, doctors will routinely use your DNA to keep you well. Cancer could then be treated on a DNA level in both the patient and tumor, at a scale and speed never before possible. Check out the video here.
Illustration and animation by Brent Clouse

Imagine if your doctor could personalize your care. IBM researchers predicts that in five years, doctors will routinely use your DNA to keep you well. Cancer could then be treated on a DNA level in both the patient and tumor, at a scale and speed never before possible. Check out the video here.

Illustration and animation by Brent Clouse

It is common knowledge that every person has an optimal way of learning. By analyzing a range of data sets that include curricula, student attendance records, and students’ behavior on e-learning platforms, IBM aims to turn big data into usable information for education systems on all levels. Want to see how syllabus can turn into syllabi? Check out the video here.
Illustration and animation by Brent Clouse

It is common knowledge that every person has an optimal way of learning. By analyzing a range of data sets that include curricula, student attendance records, and students’ behavior on e-learning platforms, IBM aims to turn big data into usable information for education systems on all levels. Want to see how syllabus can turn into syllabi? Check out the video here.

Illustration and animation by Brent Clouse

Gamers Take 3 Weeks to Solve HIV Puzzle That Has Eluded Scientists for 10 Years

Scientists from Washington University have been struggling for the past decade to decipher the complex structure of a enzyme that exhibits AIDS-like behavior, and which might hold a critical role in building a cure for the disease. Gamers playing spatial game Foldit have managed to collectively determine the enzyme’s structure in ten days.
Continue to zmescience.com

Shared by GOOD Community member Maria Redin in Health, Technology and Science

Gamers Take 3 Weeks to Solve HIV Puzzle That Has Eluded Scientists for 10 Years

Scientists from Washington University have been struggling for the past decade to decipher the complex structure of a enzyme that exhibits AIDS-like behavior, and which might hold a critical role in building a cure for the disease. Gamers playing spatial game Foldit have managed to collectively determine the enzyme’s structure in ten days.

Continue to zmescience.com

Shared by GOOD Community member Maria Redin in Health, Technology and Science

This is one of the most interesting online interactive campaigns we’ve seen that aims to protect our planet Earth. Check out how The Climate Reality Project is creatively engaging people to sign petitions on whatilove.org.
Posted by GOOD community member, Jeff Oeth in  Environment, Nature and Food

This is one of the most interesting online interactive campaigns we’ve seen that aims to protect our planet Earth. Check out how The Climate Reality Project is creatively engaging people to sign petitions on whatilove.org.

Posted by GOOD community member, Jeff Oeth in Environment, Nature and Food

We Should All Listen to Louis C.K.’s Advice on Using Smart Phones and ‘Being a Person’
Stef McDonald posted in Technology, Culture and Health

On “Conan,” Louis C.K. offered a perspective on our culture’s use of smart phones that gets to the heart of the matter. He starts with how he won’t allow his kids to have mobile phones, then launches into a moving and hilarious explanation of why that includes insights into cyber-bullying, texting and driving, emotional health, and “being a person.” (Oh, and the amazingness of Bruce Springsteen.) Best advice: “you need to build an ability to just be yourself and not be doing something.”

Answer This: Nearly 40% in the World Are Without Access to Sanitation or Toilets. What Do We Do?- Jessica Rivera wrote in in Global Citizenship, Technology, and Toilets

It’s been three weeks since we launched the Give a Shit campaign here at GOOD, to help spread awareness around sanitation issues. We developed a mobile tool to allow people to take action on their mobile phones in helping to provide better health and sanitation to people all over the world. You can check it out here. 
I joined GOOD just four weeks ago to help elevate issues within global health and development, particularly issues related to water, health, and sanitation. I’d say I’m pretty well versed in this field—I devoted the last 10 years of my education and career to it. But I’ve got to admit, I need some help answering this question. 

Continue reading on good.is
Illustration by Tyler Hoehne

Answer This: Nearly 40% in the World Are Without Access to Sanitation or Toilets. What Do We Do?
Jessica Rivera wrote in in Global Citizenship, Technology, and Toilets

It’s been three weeks since we launched the Give a Shit campaign here at GOOD, to help spread awareness around sanitation issues. We developed a mobile tool to allow people to take action on their mobile phones in helping to provide better health and sanitation to people all over the world. You can check it out here

I joined GOOD just four weeks ago to help elevate issues within global health and development, particularly issues related to water, health, and sanitation. I’d say I’m pretty well versed in this field—I devoted the last 10 years of my education and career to it. But I’ve got to admit, I need some help answering this question. 

Continue reading on good.is

Illustration by Tyler Hoehne

The Surge of Data in Healthcare- GOOD Partnerships and Matt Chase contributed in Figures Of Progress, Technology and Healthcare


We know that data is all around us. Each time you make a web search, turn on your car or even scan your rewards card at the grocery store, data is being collected. But there’s one industry where there is a lot of data being gathered, and most of it isn’t being used.
In the healthcare sector, 80 percent of patient data is unstructured—meaning it’s not being organized in a predefined manner. The Center for Disease Control estimates 42 percent of all physicians have an electronic health record system that meets federal standards, but in the healthcare field especially there are many hand written notes and charts, which can’t be easily processed by traditional computer programs.

Continue reading on good.is

The Surge of Data in Healthcare
GOOD Partnerships and Matt Chase contributed in Figures Of Progress, Technology and Healthcare

We know that data is all around us. Each time you make a web search, turn on your car or even scan your rewards card at the grocery store, data is being collected. But there’s one industry where there is a lot of data being gathered, and most of it isn’t being used.

In the healthcare sector, 80 percent of patient data is unstructured—meaning it’s not being organized in a predefined manner. The Center for Disease Control estimates 42 percent of all physicians have an electronic health record system that meets federal standards, but in the healthcare field especially there are many hand written notes and charts, which can’t be easily processed by traditional computer programs.

Continue reading on good.is

The Surge of Data in Healthcare- GOOD Partnerships and Matt Chase contributed in Figures Of Progress, Technology and Healthcare

We know that data is all around us. Each time you make a web search, turn on your car or even scan your rewards card at the grocery store, data is being collected. But there’s one industry where there is a lot of data being gathered, and most of it isn’t being used.
In the healthcare sector, 80 percent of patient data is unstructured—meaning it’s not being organized in a predefined manner. The Center for Disease Control estimates 42 percent of all physicians have an electronic health record system that meets federal standards, but in the healthcare field especially there are many hand written notes and charts, which can’t be easily processed by traditional computer programs.

Continue reading on good.is

The Surge of Data in Healthcare
GOOD Partnerships and Matt Chase contributed in Figures Of Progress, Technology and Healthcare

We know that data is all around us. Each time you make a web search, turn on your car or even scan your rewards card at the grocery store, data is being collected. But there’s one industry where there is a lot of data being gathered, and most of it isn’t being used.

In the healthcare sector, 80 percent of patient data is unstructured—meaning it’s not being organized in a predefined manner. The Center for Disease Control estimates 42 percent of all physicians have an electronic health record system that meets federal standards, but in the healthcare field especially there are many hand written notes and charts, which can’t be easily processed by traditional computer programs.

Continue reading on good.is

25,000 Mornings: 8 Ways to Improve Your Morning Routine- James Clear wrote in Health, Technology and Living


You’ll wake up for about 25,000 mornings in your adult life, give or take a few. According to a report from the World Health Organization, the average life expectancy in the United States is 79 years. Most people in wealthy nations are hovering around the 80–year mark. Women in Japan has the longest, with an average life expectancy of 86 years. If we use these average life expectancy numbers and assume that your adult life starts at 18 years old, then you’ve got about 68 years as an adult (86 – 18 = 68). Perhaps you have a little less than average; a little more if you’re lucky. (68 years as an adult) x (365 days each year) = 24,820 days. 25,000 mornings. That’s what you get in your adult life. 25,000 times you get to open your eyes, face the day, and decide what to do next. I don’t know about you, but I’ve let a lot of those mornings slip by. Once I realized this, I started thinking about how I could develop a better morning routine. I still have a lot to learn, but here are some strategies that you can use to get the most out of your 25,000 mornings.

Read James’ 8 strategies for getting the most out of his morning on good.is

25,000 Mornings: 8 Ways to Improve Your Morning Routine
James Clear wrote in Health, Technology and Living

You’ll wake up for about 25,000 mornings in your adult life, give or take a few.

According to a report from the World Health Organization, the average life expectancy in the United States is 79 years. Most people in wealthy nations are hovering around the 80–year mark. Women in Japan has the longest, with an average life expectancy of 86 years.

If we use these average life expectancy numbers and assume that your adult life starts at 18 years old, then you’ve got about 68 years as an adult (86 – 18 = 68). Perhaps you have a little less than average; a little more if you’re lucky.

(68 years as an adult) x (365 days each year) = 24,820 days.

25,000 mornings.

That’s what you get in your adult life. 25,000 times you get to open your eyes, face the day, and decide what to do next. I don’t know about you, but I’ve let a lot of those mornings slip by.

Once I realized this, I started thinking about how I could develop a better morning routine. I still have a lot to learn, but here are some strategies that you can use to get the most out of your 25,000 mornings.

Read James’ 8 strategies for getting the most out of his morning on good.is

'There's Waldo' and Other NSA-Inspired Kids' Books- Meghan Neal posted in Privacy, Technology and Creativity
Inspired by the Twitter hashtag #NSAkidsbooks that sprung up in response to NSA surveillance, an artist is re-imagining children’s book covers that mock government spying. My favorite: “Horton Hears a You.”

Continue to dailydot.com

'There's Waldo' and Other NSA-Inspired Kids' Books
Meghan Neal posted in Privacy, Technology and Creativity

Inspired by the Twitter hashtag #NSAkidsbooks that sprung up in response to NSA surveillance, an artist is re-imagining children’s book covers that mock government spying. My favorite: “Horton Hears a You.”

Continue to dailydot.com

Infographic: The Launch of Space Tourism- Alessandra Rizzotti and Corinna Loo contributed in Politics, Business and Technology
When NASA’s space shuttle program closed in 2011, the Obama Administration filled the void by reaching out to private businesses to transport crew and cargo to low-Earth orbit. With commercial space transportation accounting for over $208 billion of the United States’ economic activity and employment of over one million people, space tourism has the potential to become a new exploration industry.
According to the Fédération Aéronautique Internationale, as of January 3, 2013, a total of 530 people from 38 countries are known to have gone into space, seven of which were private citizens, made possible by the company Space Adventures. Of the 530, three people completed only a sub-orbital flight, 527 people reached Earth orbit, 24 traveled beyond low Earth orbit and 12 walked on the Moon. Whether traveling 100 kilometers above our planet, orbiting the Earth every 90 minutes, or walking on the moon, here are the private companies that are making space tourism possible.

Tell us how far you’d travel in space. To participate in our exploration challenge, simply click here to say you’ll Do It.

Infographic: The Launch of Space Tourism
Alessandra Rizzotti and Corinna Loo contributed in Politics, Business and Technology

When NASA’s space shuttle program closed in 2011, the Obama Administration filled the void by reaching out to private businesses to transport crew and cargo to low-Earth orbit. With commercial space transportation accounting for over $208 billion of the United States’ economic activity and employment of over one million people, space tourism has the potential to become a new exploration industry.

According to the Fédération Aéronautique Internationale, as of January 3, 2013, a total of 530 people from 38 countries are known to have gone into space, seven of which were private citizens, made possible by the company Space Adventures. Of the 530, three people completed only a sub-orbital flight, 527 people reached Earth orbit, 24 traveled beyond low Earth orbit and 12 walked on the Moon. Whether traveling 100 kilometers above our planet, orbiting the Earth every 90 minutes, or walking on the moon, here are the private companies that are making space tourism possible.

Tell us how far you’d travel in space. To participate in our exploration challenge, simply click here to say you’ll Do It.

Join EFF in Calling for a Full Investigation Into NSA Surveillance By Emailing Congress Today- Meghan Neal wrote in Technology, Privacy and Policy
It’s time for a full accounting of America’s secret spying programs—and an end to unconstitutional surveillance.

Continue to eff.org

Join EFF in Calling for a Full Investigation Into NSA Surveillance By Emailing Congress Today
Meghan Neal wrote in Technology, Privacy and Policy

It’s time for a full accounting of America’s secret spying programs—and an end to unconstitutional surveillance.

Continue to eff.org