Posts tagged Future


In 1988, the LA Times Magazine pub­lished a 25-year look ahead to 2013- Renee Solorzano posted in Los Angeles, Technology and Future
See what’s accurate and what’s far off.
Continue to latimes.com
The Plate Project: What Will We Be Eating in 35 Years?- Adele Peters posted in Food, Design and Future

Food & Wine asked designers and foodies to sketch out their vision of the food of the future on paper plates.
Continue to foodandwine.com

The Plate Project: What Will We Be Eating in 35 Years?
Adele Peters posted in Food, Design and Future

Food & Wine asked designers and foodies to sketch out their vision of the food of the future on paper plates.

Continue to foodandwine.com

LETTER TO YOURSELF
We know that resolutions can be tough to keep, so we have a plan to help. Write a letter to yourself with your 2013 goals, and in six months, we’ll send it back to you to make sure you are keeping yourself on track.
Created by the folks at General Assembly

LETTER TO YOURSELF

We know that resolutions can be tough to keep, so we have a plan to help. Write a letter to yourself with your 2013 goals, and in six months, we’ll send it back to you to make sure you are keeping yourself on track.

Created by the folks at General Assembly

Help Build a Vibrantly Multilingual World- Laura Welcher wrote in Culture, Future and Language

Most people don’t know this, but there are a lot more languages spoken in the world than the ones we hear every day. In fact, there are around 7,000 different languages, and each one tells a part of the story of our human experience on Planet Earth.
This tremendous richness of human linguistic diversity took thousands of years to develop, yet it is rapidly disappearing. Linguists expect that within the next century we will lose up to 90 percent of the world’s languages as we converge on a few of the mostly widely used ones for global communication and commerce.
Continue reading on good.is

Illustration by Tyler Hoehne

Help Build a Vibrantly Multilingual World
Laura Welcher wrote in Culture, Future and Language

Most people don’t know this, but there are a lot more languages spoken in the world than the ones we hear every day. In fact, there are around 7,000 different languages, and each one tells a part of the story of our human experience on Planet Earth.

This tremendous richness of human linguistic diversity took thousands of years to develop, yet it is rapidly disappearing. Linguists expect that within the next century we will lose up to 90 percent of the world’s languages as we converge on a few of the mostly widely used ones for global communication and commerce.

Continue reading on good.is

Illustration by Tyler Hoehne

Connecting Broadly Won’t Replace the Importance of Connecting Deeply- tiffanyshlain wrote in Technology, Living and Future
The following is an excerpt from Brain Power: From Neurons to Networks, a new film and TED Book.

How will the internet affect the human brain and human culture as a whole? This story is still being played out. In a 2009 study published in the journal Cell Death and Differentiation, Italian scientists found that physical activity, social interaction, and multi-sensory stimulation affects the central nervous system both in terms of turning on certain genes as well as causing the increased growth of cells, especially the visual system of the cerebral cortex. For example, the act of reading these words is influencing the connections in your brain right now. But since we, humans, are the ones creating this technology, we are equally responsible for how we use it. We can choose when we use technology, and we can choose when to turn it off. We can also choose when to focus our attention on the things that are deeply important—truly being present with people we love.
Continue reading on good.is

Illustration by Tyler Hoehne

Connecting Broadly Won’t Replace the Importance of Connecting Deeply
tiffanyshlain wrote in Technology, Living and Future

The following is an excerpt from Brain Power: From Neurons to Networks, a new film and TED Book.

How will the internet affect the human brain and human culture as a whole? This story is still being played out. In a 2009 study published in the journal Cell Death and Differentiation, Italian scientists found that physical activity, social interaction, and multi-sensory stimulation affects the central nervous system both in terms of turning on certain genes as well as causing the increased growth of cells, especially the visual system of the cerebral cortex. For example, the act of reading these words is influencing the connections in your brain right now. But since we, humans, are the ones creating this technology, we are equally responsible for how we use it. We can choose when we use technology, and we can choose when to turn it off. We can also choose when to focus our attention on the things that are deeply important—truly being present with people we love.

Continue reading on good.is

Illustration by Tyler Hoehne

An Illustrated Future: How Artists Imagined France in the Year 2000- Reboot Stories posted in Creativity, Inventions and Predictions
"The Rural Postman", "Aviation Police", "A Whale Bus". French artists from 1899-1910 were spot on with some of their predictions while others are just flat-out hilarious. What are some other predictions of the future that you’ve found interesting?
View entire set here

An Illustrated Future: How Artists Imagined France in the Year 2000
Reboot Stories posted in Creativity, Inventions and Predictions

"The Rural Postman", "Aviation Police", "A Whale Bus". French artists from 1899-1910 were spot on with some of their predictions while others are just flat-out hilarious. What are some other predictions of the future that you’ve found interesting?

View entire set here

Make a Wish for the Future: What’s Yours?Reboot Stories wrote in Living, Future and Time
What would you say to your great-great grandchild? To future generations?
Together, let’s create a story world that envisions a better world. Today begins a two-month activation that begins with one simple request: Make a wish, a Wish for the Future.
Here’s how you can participate:
Make a wish for the future in 140 characters or less.
“Grant” a wish by choosing someone else’s wish and expanding on it in an idea, story or action. Granted wishes can be shared by posting a link/photo/video/audio clip on good.is or on Twitter @GOOD using #W4tF.
We place your wishes and granted wishes into a time capsule for 100 years.
That’s right, a time capsule, one that 100 hundred ninth-graders from NYC’s Quest to Learn will design…with you. During the next two months, we as a community will think about what the time capsule should look like, where it should be buried and what should be put inside.
To lend some background, Wish for the Future was inspired by the Voyager Golden Records— phonograph records that were sent into space in 1977 aboard the Voyager spacecraft. These contain sounds and images showing the diversity of life on Earth, and are intended for intelligent extraterrestrial life or future humans to find. Additionally, Wish for the Future’s call to action originates with these words by R. Buckminster Fuller:
Make the world work, for 100 percent of humanity, in the shortest possible time, through spontaneous cooperation, without ecological offense or the disadvantage of anyone.
We at Reboot Stories, who will humbly be serving as your tour guides into the future, want to ignite the imaginations of many for social change. As people of all ages all over the world turn wishes into ideas, stories and actions for the time capsule, we begin to collectively design our own future.
We’ve got 60 days starting… now. 
For the first month, we’ll focus on making wishes. You can post your wish in the comments below. We’d love to know where on Earth your wish is coming from, so make sure to tag your location in your GOOD profile.
During the second month, we’ll focus on granting each other’s wishes. You can grant a wish by expanding it in an idea, story or action. Then simply post the text/link/photo/video/audio clip on good.is or Twitter using #W4tF.
The time capsule will be filled with your creations in early February. We plan to bury it in 2014, although the details will organically grow out of this collaboration with you. One idea is to have the time capsule emit radio signals every five years to remind users of your wishes until batteries die out. Another hope is for people in the future to unearth the capsule in 2114 and connect with what you wished for them. Who these people are and what they find will be determined by our collective design.
Your wishes and granted wishes (see steps 1 and 2 above for more detail or visit our site) will also live on at wishforthefuture.com. The first 25 people to grant a wish will receive a limited edition Wish for the Future card in the mail. So join in and let’s have some fun.  
This post is part of a series of posts examining the idea time and imagining our collective future. Tell us your wish for the future here and we’ll bury it in a time capsule.
Illustration by Tyler Hoehne

Make a Wish for the Future: What’s Yours?
Reboot Stories wrote in Living, Future and Time

What would you say to your great-great grandchild? To future generations?

Together, let’s create a story world that envisions a better world. Today begins a two-month activation that begins with one simple request: Make a wish, a Wish for the Future.

Here’s how you can participate:

  • Make a wish for the future in 140 characters or less.
  • “Grant” a wish by choosing someone else’s wish and expanding on it in an idea, story or action. Granted wishes can be shared by posting a link/photo/video/audio clip on good.is or on Twitter @GOOD using #W4tF.
  • We place your wishes and granted wishes into a time capsule for 100 years.

That’s right, a time capsule, one that 100 hundred ninth-graders from NYC’s Quest to Learn will design…with you. During the next two months, we as a community will think about what the time capsule should look like, where it should be buried and what should be put inside.

To lend some background, Wish for the Future was inspired by the Voyager Golden Records— phonograph records that were sent into space in 1977 aboard the Voyager spacecraft. These contain sounds and images showing the diversity of life on Earth, and are intended for intelligent extraterrestrial life or future humans to find. Additionally, Wish for the Future’s call to action originates with these words by R. Buckminster Fuller:

Make the world work, for 100 percent of humanity, in the shortest possible time, through spontaneous cooperation, without ecological offense or the disadvantage of anyone.

We at Reboot Stories, who will humbly be serving as your tour guides into the future, want to ignite the imaginations of many for social change. As people of all ages all over the world turn wishes into ideas, stories and actions for the time capsule, we begin to collectively design our own future.

We’ve got 60 days starting… now. 

For the first month, we’ll focus on making wishes. You can post your wish in the comments below. We’d love to know where on Earth your wish is coming from, so make sure to tag your location in your GOOD profile.

During the second month, we’ll focus on granting each other’s wishes. You can grant a wish by expanding it in an idea, story or action. Then simply post the text/link/photo/video/audio clip on good.is or Twitter using #W4tF.

The time capsule will be filled with your creations in early February. We plan to bury it in 2014, although the details will organically grow out of this collaboration with you. One idea is to have the time capsule emit radio signals every five years to remind users of your wishes until batteries die out. Another hope is for people in the future to unearth the capsule in 2114 and connect with what you wished for them. Who these people are and what they find will be determined by our collective design.

Your wishes and granted wishes (see steps 1 and 2 above for more detail or visit our site) will also live on at wishforthefuture.com. The first 25 people to grant a wish will receive a limited edition Wish for the Future card in the mail. So join in and let’s have some fun.  

This post is part of a series of posts examining the idea time and imagining our collective future. Tell us your wish for the future here and we’ll bury it in a time capsule.

Illustration by Tyler Hoehne

The Top 10 Technology Game Changers for the Next Decade
How close to reality are some of our most futuristic fantasies? Consider that going to the moon was once a giant step for mankind, but in the near future you’ll be able to purchase a two-week vacation to the International Space Station (if you’ve got a few million bucks to spare, of course). Here’s our list of 10 incredible technological innovations that are poised to change our lives within the next decade.
Read the list at GOOD.is

The Top 10 Technology Game Changers for the Next Decade

How close to reality are some of our most futuristic fantasies? Consider that going to the moon was once a giant step for mankind, but in the near future you’ll be able to purchase a two-week vacation to the International Space Station (if you’ve got a few million bucks to spare, of course). Here’s our list of 10 incredible technological innovations that are poised to change our lives within the next decade.

Read the list at GOOD.is

Young People Have the Bleakest Futures—But the Best Attitudes
A new study confirms our worst fears: Young people have the fewest jobs in 60 years. So why are we so optimistic?
Read about it on GOOD→ 

Young People Have the Bleakest Futures—But the Best Attitudes

A new study confirms our worst fears: Young people have the fewest jobs in 60 years. So why are we so optimistic?

Read about it on GOOD→ 

H.O.R.T.U.S., a ‘cyber greenhouse’ in London that replaces traditional plants with bags of algae.

Claudia Pasquero and Marco Poletto of London-based studio EcoLogic have created a sci-fi ‘greenhouse’ in which 325 transparent photobioreactor bags containing nine different species of algae have taken the place of traditional plants. 

Greenhouses of the future! (Visitors blow into plastic tubes to help the algae grow.)

(via publicradiointernational)

What does tomorrow look like?
To assemble our second-ever GOOD 100 list (check out the first here),  we surveyed culture and politics to pick out trends and seemingly minor  moments that tell us where we’re all headed, together. The big picture  is pretty exciting.
Here are 100 glimpses of the immediate future,  in a unique interactive experience thanks to our partner Fiat. What’s  the new Apple? The new unpaid internship? The new Adderall? The new  black? We’ve got your answers.
Read more on GOOD→

What does tomorrow look like?

To assemble our second-ever GOOD 100 list (check out the first here), we surveyed culture and politics to pick out trends and seemingly minor moments that tell us where we’re all headed, together. The big picture is pretty exciting.

Here are 100 glimpses of the immediate future, in a unique interactive experience thanks to our partner Fiat. What’s the new Apple? The new unpaid internship? The new Adderall? The new black? We’ve got your answers.

Read more on GOOD→