Posts tagged Biking

Citizenship Building Block #18: Try Biking to Work- Zachary Slobig wrote in Transportation, Cities and Living
Commuting sucks. ‘Mega commuters’ endure 90 minutes each way to punch the clock. More Americans fall into that category than there are residents of Copenhagen. Why point to that Danish city? It’s got the busiest biking street in the Western world—the result of years of public pressure and infrastructure investment that reshaped commuting habits. The arguments for bike commuting are familiar: healthier for you and the environment; saves you tons of cash; often faster than driving or taking public transit. Here’s another: it’s an opportunity to see your city or town without looking through a pane of shatter-proof glass. Another: it’s a lot of fun. In many places it can seem too dangerous to bike to work—no bike lanes and a gauntlet of taxi doors and four-wheeled aggression. A suggestion to mitigate those concerns: find at least one bike buddy. There’s strength (and safety) in numbers. So go ahead and try it. This week, saddle up and ride a bike to work. It might become a habit.
Continue to good.is

Citizenship Building Block #18: Try Biking to Work
Zachary Slobig wrote in Transportation, Cities and Living

Commuting sucks. ‘Mega commuters’ endure 90 minutes each way to punch the clock. More Americans fall into that category than there are residents of Copenhagen. Why point to that Danish city? It’s got the busiest biking street in the Western world—the result of years of public pressure and infrastructure investment that reshaped commuting habits. The arguments for bike commuting are familiar: healthier for you and the environment; saves you tons of cash; often faster than driving or taking public transit. Here’s another: it’s an opportunity to see your city or town without looking through a pane of shatter-proof glass. Another: it’s a lot of fun. In many places it can seem too dangerous to bike to work—no bike lanes and a gauntlet of taxi doors and four-wheeled aggression. A suggestion to mitigate those concerns: find at least one bike buddy. There’s strength (and safety) in numbers. So go ahead and try it. This week, saddle up and ride a bike to work. It might become a habit.

Continue to good.is

In 1897, a Bicycle Superhighway Was the Future of California Transit- Yasha Wallin posted in Transportation, Bikes and Biking
In 1897, a wealthy American businessman named Horace Dobbins began construction on a private, for-profit bicycle superhighway that would stretch from Pasadena to downtown Los Angeles. It may seem like a preposterous notion now—everyone knows Angelenos don’t get out of their cars—but at the time, amidst the height of a pre-automobile worldwide cycling boom, the idea attracted the attention of some hugely powerful players. And it almost got built.
Continue to vice.com

In 1897, a Bicycle Superhighway Was the Future of California Transit
Yasha Wallin posted in Transportation, Bikes and Biking

In 1897, a wealthy American businessman named Horace Dobbins began construction on a private, for-profit bicycle superhighway that would stretch from Pasadena to downtown Los Angeles. It may seem like a preposterous notion now—everyone knows Angelenos don’t get out of their cars—but at the time, amidst the height of a pre-automobile worldwide cycling boom, the idea attracted the attention of some hugely powerful players. And it almost got built.

Continue to vice.com

A Stronger Bike Helmet, Made of Cardboard and Inspired by a Woodpecker- Adele Peters wrote in Health, Technology and Sustainability

When Anirudha Surabhi was a grad student at the Royal College of Art in London, he was in a bike accident. Even though it was a minor crash, and Surabhi was wearing an expensive helmet, the next day he learned that he had a concussion. He spent three days in the hospital. He wondered why the helmet hadn’t worked—and decided to explore the problem for his thesis project.

It turns out that bike helmets are not as safe as they’re portrayed to be. Over the last few decades, Surabhi says, some helmets have gotten more aerodynamic and better-looking, but they haven’t gotten any better at protecting us from injuries.
As he began working on his design, Surabhi looked at the anatomy of a woodpecker for inspiration. When a woodpecker slams its beak into the trunk of a tree, the impact is cushioned by a special micro-structure between the beak and head. By mirroring that structure—after testing 150 different materials—Surabhi was able to create a helmet that can withstand three times greater impact than a standard helmet. 

Special cardboard ribs inside the helmet are designed for flexibility. The cardboard itself has a honeycomb structure filled with air pockets to provide more cushioning. It’s stronger than a standard helmet liner, and lighter. 
It’s also greener than the ubiquitous polystyrene foam liners. Foam, unsurprisingly, is not great for the environment; the manufacturing process is a health hazard, and it also creates hazardous waste. It’s also more energy-intensive to produce than cardboard. Surabhi used 100 percent recycled cardboard, which he says takes no electricity to produce at all.
For the full design story, watch the video below. The helmet’s in production now, and Core77 reports that the first U.S. version of the helmet will be out next year through ABUS.
Watch video

Images courtesy of Anirudha Surabhi

A Stronger Bike Helmet, Made of Cardboard and Inspired by a Woodpecker
Adele Peters wrote in HealthTechnology and Sustainability

When Anirudha Surabhi was a grad student at the Royal College of Art in London, he was in a bike accident. Even though it was a minor crash, and Surabhi was wearing an expensive helmet, the next day he learned that he had a concussion. He spent three days in the hospital. He wondered why the helmet hadn’t worked—and decided to explore the problem for his thesis project.

It turns out that bike helmets are not as safe as they’re portrayed to be. Over the last few decades, Surabhi says, some helmets have gotten more aerodynamic and better-looking, but they haven’t gotten any better at protecting us from injuries.

As he began working on his design, Surabhi looked at the anatomy of a woodpecker for inspiration. When a woodpecker slams its beak into the trunk of a tree, the impact is cushioned by a special micro-structure between the beak and head. By mirroring that structure—after testing 150 different materials—Surabhi was able to create a helmet that can withstand three times greater impact than a standard helmet. 

Special cardboard ribs inside the helmet are designed for flexibility. The cardboard itself has a honeycomb structure filled with air pockets to provide more cushioning. It’s stronger than a standard helmet liner, and lighter. 

It’s also greener than the ubiquitous polystyrene foam liners. Foam, unsurprisingly, is not great for the environment; the manufacturing process is a health hazard, and it also creates hazardous waste. It’s also more energy-intensive to produce than cardboard. Surabhi used 100 percent recycled cardboard, which he says takes no electricity to produce at all.

For the full design story, watch the video below. The helmet’s in production now, and Core77 reports that the first U.S. version of the helmet will be out next year through ABUS.

Watch video

Images courtesy of Anirudha Surabhi

GOOD Ideas for Cities: Designing Guerrilla Bike Signage

How to make a city’s streets more comfortable for bikers? A team from New Orleans went ahead and installed their own bikeway signage.

What kind of bike rider are you?
Reblog to let us know or share on Facebook!
Enter to win a brand spankin’ new bike from Civia Cycles here: http://on.fb.me/OC9qg1

Illustration by Corinna Loo

What kind of bike rider are you?

Reblog to let us know or share on Facebook!

Enter to win a brand spankin’ new bike from Civia Cycles here: http://on.fb.me/OC9qg1

Illustration by Corinna Loo

When you think of a road trip across America, you probably envision zooming in a car along endless scenic highways and freeway overpasses. But take a closer look and across the country, there are thousands of miles of bike lanes connecting us from city to city and even coast to coast.
Within urban areas, more people are traveling to work or running errands on two wheels thanks to safer and more well-designed bike routes. Whether people are using them for work, exercise, vacation, or just a leisurely Sunday afternoon backcountry ride, bike lanes are thriving as thoroughfares in our bike nation.Check out our latest infographic that shows just how closely tied together we are by bike paths, and see how bike lanes in cities across the country compare.
Infographic: The United Bike Lanes of America - Read more on GOOD.is 

When you think of a road trip across America, you probably envision zooming in a car along endless scenic highways and freeway overpasses. But take a closer look and across the country, there are thousands of miles of bike lanes connecting us from city to city and even coast to coast.

Within urban areas, more people are traveling to work or running errands on two wheels thanks to safer and more well-designed bike routes. Whether people are using them for work, exercise, vacation, or just a leisurely Sunday afternoon backcountry ride, bike lanes are thriving as thoroughfares in our bike nation.Check out our latest infographic that shows just how closely tied together we are by bike paths, and see how bike lanes in cities across the country compare.

Infographic: The United Bike Lanes of America - Read more on GOOD.is 

Today marks the beginning of Bike Nation, GOOD’s weeklong celebration of pedal power. We’re not the only ones who are excited—biking is more popular than ever. But when it comes time to divvy up the nation’s transportation budget, cyclists and pedestrians tend to get the short end of the stick.
Check out our infographic about Americans on two wheels—and why Congress should help them out.

Today marks the beginning of Bike Nation, GOOD’s weeklong celebration of pedal power. We’re not the only ones who are excited—biking is more popular than ever. But when it comes time to divvy up the nation’s transportation budget, cyclists and pedestrians tend to get the short end of the stick.

Check out our infographic about Americans on two wheels—and why Congress should help them out.

Can Discounts Convince Londoners to Bike and Walk?
“When it comes to commuting, you commute by force of habit,” says Ian Yolles, chief sustainability officer of the eco-rewards company Recyclebank. “It’s become such a habit that you get to the end of your journey and you don’t remember getting there.”
But perhaps using discounts to incentivize better commuting behavior—biking instead of driving, for example—can make people break their habits. In London, a new initiative will put the theory to the test. 
Read more at GOOD.is

Can Discounts Convince Londoners to Bike and Walk?

“When it comes to commuting, you commute by force of habit,” says Ian Yolles, chief sustainability officer of the eco-rewards company Recyclebank. “It’s become such a habit that you get to the end of your journey and you don’t remember getting there.”

But perhaps using discounts to incentivize better commuting behavior—biking instead of driving, for example—can make people break their habits. In London, a new initiative will put the theory to the test. 

Read more at GOOD.is

Any urban bicyclist can share with you the frustration of having to avoid people and cars blocking what should be clear bicycle lanes. Sometimes it can make you want to destroy all the impediments with a tank. Today, in Vilnius, Lithuania, mayor Arturas Zuokas lived out the fantasy of every bike messenger forced to dodge a Dodge (or BMW or Toyota) on their daily route.
Read more on GOOD →

Any urban bicyclist can share with you the frustration of having to avoid people and cars blocking what should be clear bicycle lanes. Sometimes it can make you want to destroy all the impediments with a tank. Today, in Vilnius, Lithuania, mayor Arturas Zuokas lived out the fantasy of every bike messenger forced to dodge a Dodge (or BMW or Toyota) on their daily route.

Read more on GOOD →

Solving the issues of bulky bike locks is something we definitely think is a great idea, and this design is pretty elegant. No more stretched out back pockets! Bikers rejoice! 
See more of our favorite projects on Kickstarter on our curated projects page. 
TiGr: Titanium Lock as Cool as your Bike by John Loughlin — Kickstarter

Solving the issues of bulky bike locks is something we definitely think is a great idea, and this design is pretty elegant. No more stretched out back pockets! Bikers rejoice! 

See more of our favorite projects on Kickstarter on our curated projects page

TiGr: Titanium Lock as Cool as your Bike by John Loughlin — Kickstarter