How MS Took One Woman From Public Interest Lawyer to Artist- Alessandra Rizzotti wrote in Health, Research and Art


Elizabeth Jameson’s life mission has always been to make the world a better place. As a public interest lawyer in the 1980s, she made civil rights issues a big part of her career. So when Jameson was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis in 1992, she made it an opportunity for advocacy. Rather than completely stopping her efforts to help others, she turned to art as an outlet to produce beautifully haunting public interest art. Her pieces explore the complexity of her changing brain and have the power to change the way others living with MS, doctors, and neuroscientists see the narrative of chronic illness. Creating vibrantly colored solarplate etchings, as well as digital and textile collages of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, Jameson makes MS accessible and approachable to those who know nothing of the disease.

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This content was produced by GOOD, with support from The National MS Society. To read more stories about inspiring everyday heroes, check out the People are Awesome series.

How MS Took One Woman From Public Interest Lawyer to Artist
Alessandra Rizzotti wrote in Health, Research and Art

Elizabeth Jameson’s life mission has always been to make the world a better place. As a public interest lawyer in the 1980s, she made civil rights issues a big part of her career. So when Jameson was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis in 1992, she made it an opportunity for advocacy. Rather than completely stopping her efforts to help others, she turned to art as an outlet to produce beautifully haunting public interest art. Her pieces explore the complexity of her changing brain and have the power to change the way others living with MS, doctors, and neuroscientists see the narrative of chronic illness. Creating vibrantly colored solarplate etchings, as well as digital and textile collages of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, Jameson makes MS accessible and approachable to those who know nothing of the disease.

Continue reading on good.is

This content was produced by GOOD, with support from The National MS Society. To read more stories about inspiring everyday heroes, check out the People are Awesome series.

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