Beginning April 4, an exhibition called This Side of Paradise will dive deep into the Bronx’s oft-forgotten opulent past. The Andrew Freedman House, the enormous building where the exhibition is set, now sits largely abandoned, but was originally created in the 1920s—in a bizarre act of charity—as a retirement home for broke aristocrats to live out their final days in luxury. Thirty artists are currently having their way with the building’s numerous rooms, many of which haven’t been touched in years. 
Read about the initiative to rediscover the Bronx’s lost treasures at GOOD.is

Beginning April 4, an exhibition called This Side of Paradise will dive deep into the Bronx’s oft-forgotten opulent past. The Andrew Freedman House, the enormous building where the exhibition is set, now sits largely abandoned, but was originally created in the 1920s—in a bizarre act of charity—as a retirement home for broke aristocrats to live out their final days in luxury. Thirty artists are currently having their way with the building’s numerous rooms, many of which haven’t been touched in years. 

Read about the initiative to rediscover the Bronx’s lost treasures at GOOD.is

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